James Innis (c1665 – 1710)

Unless otherwise noted, these are my abstracts of original records.  

4 June 1690
Will: John Carter.  Wife, legacies to minor daughter Elizabeth, brothers Charles and Robert, and several others including “to my good friends Mr. Jas. Lason, Mr. Morris, his wife and Dr. Innis forty shillings apiece to buy them each a ring.”  Witnessed by John Morris, James Innis, Margaret Biggins.  At a court held for the County of Lancaster 11 June 1690  John Morris, James Innis, Margaret Biggins “made oath that they heard Col. John Carter dec’d. declare this will to be his last will & testament & was in perfect sense and in disposing memory to the best of their apprehension.”   [Lancaster County Will Book 8, pp 3.]

John Carter was the oldest child of Col. John Carter of Corotoman and half-brother to Robert and Charles. His daughter Elizabeth, who later married John Lloyd and died without issue, was his only child.  Charles died unmarried and without issue leaving Robert to inherit much of the Carter estates.  Robert became the richest man in Virginia, perhaps the continent.    

21 December 1694
Land Grant: Francis Waddington, 500 acres on Potomack Creek in Stafford County adjoining Edward Wheeler and Thomas Mathews.  Signed: James Innis Clerk. [Recorded about September 1703 in in Stafford County Will Book Z 1699-1709, page 283. Courtesy of Anne Goodwin. The grant is in Northern Neck Grants Book 2, page 103-4.]

Richard Whitehead of Westmoreland had been the clerk of the land office for several years. [McIlwaine’s Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. I, pp 201, 217, 238, 260.]  But at a Westmoreland County court of 26 July 1693 a certificate was read from Richard Whitehead “Clerk of the Proprietor’s Office for the Northern Neck” shutting the office down. [The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 89, No. 1 (Jan., 1981), page 40.]. This coincided with William Fitzhugh and George Brent replacing Philip Ludwell as the Proprietor’s agent. (Ludwell was appointed Governor of the two Carolinas in 1693.)  Fitzhugh and Brent evidently hired James Innis to replace Whitehead. It’s worth exploring what connection James Innis might have had to Fitzhugh and/or Brent.  (A collection of Fitzhugh’s letters during the period has been published and there are probably other records of potential interest.)  A later record shows that James Innis continued as clerk when Robert Carter succeeded Fitzhugh and Brent in 1702.  James Innis was apparently succeeded by Thomas Hooper sometime around 1704-5.

29 April 1695
Will: Henry Bell… Land and household goods to minor daughter Rebecca Bell.  One shilling each to sons Henry Bell and William Bell when they come of age.  One shilling to unborn child “if mine”.  One-fourth of personal estate to wife Rebecca.  If daughter Rebecca should die before she comes of age or marries, land to Richard Wren Senior and personal estate divided between William Wren and Katherine Ball, daughter os Thomas and Sarah Ball.   Executors: “my well beloved friends Andrew Jackson, Capt. William Lister and Doctor James Innis and Mr. Nicholas Wren”.  Witness: William Bousch, Elizabeth Wrenn, Thomas Bell. Proved in court July 1695.  [Will Book 8, pp 49.]

Another indication that James Innis was full-fledged member of local society.  Andrew Jackson was minister of Christ Church.  William Wren was Henry Bell’s grandson and Katherine Ball was his granddaughter.  Nicholas Wren was his son-in-law.  Lister was a justice.  Note: Later records suggest that Innis and Wren may have declined the executorship as references to the estate seem to mention only Jackson and Lister.

Rebecca was Bell’s second or third wife, supposed to have had an extramarital affair.  Henry Bell may have suspected that the two sons were not his, which might explain their miserly legacies.

1695
Tithables: No Innis in Lancaster County [Lancaster County Order Book 3 (1686-16960, pp167.]

I did not see him in prior years either. Was he living elsewhere or was he tithable to another taxpayer? 

30 December 1697
Will: George Heale…. land to sons George, John, and Joseph Heale.  Small tract to daughter Ellen Heale with reversion to daughters Elizabeth or Sarah Heale. Another tract to daughters Elizabeth and Sarah Heale.  Another tract to son George Heale for the use of son George Heale, with reversion to the child his wife is pregnant with.  Refers to effects in Great Britain and Ireland. Executor: son George Heale. Overseers: “my loving friend Mr. Robert Carter & my son-in-law Mr. William Ball”. Witness: Joseph Ball, James Innis, William Ball.  Recorded 2 February 1698.  [Lancaster County will Book 8, page 74.]. (Wm Ball a justice)

10 August 1698
Administration: Commiss’n of Administration of ye Estate of Henry Ball dec’d is granted until the  of estate of Henry Bell granted to unto Tho.. Hathaway & Rebecca his wife they given security according to Law [with] Mr. Geo. Flower & [with] James Innis Security.  [Lancaster County Order Book 4 (1696-1702), page 42.]

10 November 1698
Tithables: James Innis – 2
[Lancaster County Order Book 4 (1696-1702), pp 50.]

I did not see James Innis as a tithable in prior years, though most of those lists are either damaged or difficult to read.  In particular I did not see James Innis in Order Book 4 lists of tithables for 1696 (pp 7) or 1697 (pp 32) but those pages are partially damaged. It is possible that he was tithable to someone else. Was the land office clerk tithable to the agent?

11 November 1698
Judgment:  This day Roger Williams Confessed Judgm’t to Doct’r James Innis for 1000 lb. too & Casque which is order to be paid with Cost. [Lancaster County Order Book 4 (1696-1702), page 52.]

Roger Williams and Ann his wife were executors of the estate of her former husband John Emberson, and were also sued by Robert Carter and others.  This debt does not mention the estate, so must have been his own.

28 January 1698/9
Inventory: Estate of John Addams deceased, recorded January 1698/9.
Due to Capt. Willliam Jones & Doct’r James Innis £0;6:6. [Lancaster County Will Book 8, page 51.]. Just tripped over this, might be worth trudging through the images.

8 March 1698/9
Judgment: Judgement is granted unto James Innis ag’t Tho. Pinkard as adm’tor to his dec’d mother for 40 lb. of tobacco which is ordered to be forthwith paid with Cost. [Lancaster County Order Book 4 (1696-1702), page 61.]

Pinkard’s mother was Elizabeth, widow of John Pinkard.

9 November 1699
Tithables, Christ Church parish:  James Innis – 3
[Lancaster County Order Book 4 (1696-1702), pp 98.]

9 April 1700
Jointure Contract:  Indenture by Robert Carter “for & in consideraton of a marriage already agreed upon & shortly by gods grace to be had & Solemnized between the sd Robert Carter & Betty Willis late the wife of Richard Willis of Middlesex County, gent decd… [mentions a tract described as] “that messuage tenem’t. or parcel of land lying and being in the parish & County aforesd upon or towards the head of the Eastern branch of Corotoman river which now Doctor Innis lives upon containing by estimation two hundred acres be it more or les the sd tract or parcel of land formerly belonging to Mrs. Martha Norris decd and by her sold to the sd Robt Carter…” [Lancaster County Deed Book 2, pp 412-416.]

This explains where James Innis was living.  Note that Carter was not yet land agent for the Proprietor.  This indenture was, in essence, a settlement of land to Betty (Landon) Willis in lieu of dower should she survive her husband.  Betty, who was perhaps about sixteen at the time, had been the third wife of Richard Willis, was newly widowed, and was Carter’s second wife.  The mother of Carter’s ten children, she died in her mid-thirties in 1719 so the settlement never materialized. 

14 January 1700/1
Tithables, Christ Church parish:  James Innis – 4
[Lancaster County Order Book 4 (1696-1702), pp 128.]

10 December 1701
Tithables: James Innis – 5
[Lancaster County Order Book 4 (1696-1702), pp 152.]

12 April 1702
See 16 April 1702 below.

15 April 1702
Court:  Motion of James Innis, John Steptoe, & Tho: Pinkard a Probate to them of the Last Will of John Eustace deed, proved by John Steptee, George Hale & John Hurst.  [Abstracted by Lindsay O. Duvall, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Series II, Vol. I, “Northumberland County Court Orders 1678-1713”, page 62, referencing Northumberland County Court Orders #5, page 196.]

John Eustace’s will was dated 23 December 1701. According to Duvall’s abstract, the will is only partially readable but two of the legible legatees were Thomas Pinkard and Margaret his wife, and  John Steptoe.  Was James Innis or Katherine a legatee?  The three men above were named executors. The will is supposed to be in Record Book 17, page 245, and is worth trying to find.  .

16 April 1702
Henry Mayes Jun. attorney of his father Henry Mayes acknowledges deed of sale of land to James Innis. [Restatement of abstract by Duvall, page 63, referencing Northumberland County Court Orders #5, page 199.]

Note:  Beverley Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. 19, Northumbria Collectanea 1645-1720, on page 91 abstracted the deed as “Henry Mayes refs to land sold (to Dr. James Innis) adj. Thomas Mayes.” referring to Northumberland County Record Book 17, page 206.  The abstract in Duvall seems to clarify the event.  This may be the same land sold to Howson in 1704.

12 November 1702
Tithables, Christ Church parish:   James Innis – 4
|[Lancaster County Order Book 5, page 12.]

14 April 1703
Headright Claim:  At a court held for Lancaster County on 4 July 1703… “ James Innis proved the following rites being for ye several persons imported into this Country whose names are hereunder recorded vizt: Jno. Foot, Tho. (Carroll?), Alex’r Robinson, Benj. Wood, James Ennis (sic), Tho. Smith.” [Lancaster County Order Book 5, page 28.]

10 November 1703
Tithables, Christ Church parish:   James Innis – 5
[Lancaster County Order Book 5, page 55.]

10 March 1703/4
Land Grant:  James Innis of Lancaster County, 628 acres in Richmond County on the Fall Run of Rappahannock adjoining the land of John Waugh. “Whereas Thomas Wallis sometime since obtained a deed from our office… bearing date ye 9th day of March 1694/5 for 1,040 acres of land situate on the fall run of Rappahanock… Wallis having never made any settlement on ye said land nor paid ye Quitt rents thereof…and being departed some years since not known whither… James Innis of Lancaster County moving to be be preferred to a second grant of part of ye said land and some adjoining not yet granted…”  Tract surveyed on the 11th day of November last for Robert Carter  Esq. “who hath since assign’d his right of ye said land survey to ye said James Innis…” [Northern Neck Grants Book 3, page 21.]

Robert Carter had been made Fairfax’s agent for the Northern Neck land office in 1702.  Perhaps to disguise his acquisitions from the Proprietors, Carter began to acquire large tracts of land by making grants to friends and cronies who then conveyed the land back to Carter James Innis conveyed this land to Carter six months later. Innis would transfer a total of four of his land grants to Carter.

10 March 1703/4
Land Grant: James Innis, 624 acres in  Richmond County.  Surveyed on 10 November last for Robert Carter Esq. “and ye said Carter having since assign’d his right of ye said Survey unto James Innis who hath moved for our deed for ye said land… Beginning at a white oake standing on ye northward side of ye main Run or River of Rappahanock about four miles above ye falls of ye said river…. [Northern Neck Grants Book 3, page 22.]

James Innis sells both of these grants  to Robert Carter six months later for a pittance. Robert Carter was in the habit of acquiring land in other people’s names. This is just one example.

These two parcels, of 1,252 acres altogether, located in what became King George County, were evidently considered prime land by Robert Carter, who called this his “Falls Plantation” in correspondence.  It was called the “Falls Quarter” in Carter’s estate inventory of 1732 when it housed 32 slaves.

1 June 1704
Land Grant:  James Innis of Lancaster County, 975 acres in Richmond County. “Whereas Thomas Wallis sometime since of Stafford County obtained a deed from our office… bearing date ye 9th day of March 1694/5 for 1040 acres of land situate on the fall run of Rappahanock… Wallis having never made any settlement on ye said land nor paid ye Quitt rents thereof…and being departed some years since not known whither… James Innis of Lancaster County moving to be be preferred to a second grant of part of ye lsaid and some adjoining not yet granted… ” Tract surveyed on the 10th day of November last for 975 acres “situate upon a brook or Run known by the name of Great Gravelly Run falling into the Rappahanock River about two miles above the falls of said River…” [Northern Neck Grants Book 3, page 29.]

This is the only grant of land actually intended for James Innis, so evidently was his home plantation.  He devised portions of it to his children in his will.  It fell into King George County when that county was created in 1720. 

1 June 1704.
Land Grant: James Innis, 11,128 acres in Stafford and Richmond Counties.  ” Whereas Robert Carter Esq. of Lancaster County in Novemb’r last made a survey of 16,215 acres of land situate and being in Richmond and Stafford Coauntys in the forest above ye falls of Rappahanock upon ye branches of ye run called Potomack Run falling into Potomack Creek, upon ye run called Deep Run falling into ye River of Rappahannock about ___ miles above ye falls thereof and upon ye run called Ocquin falling into Potomack River… [survey encompassed lands previously granted to Malachy Peale, William Laine, John Wright, Joseph Hinson, and Thomas Norman] …and ye said Robert Carter having assigned over his right of in and to the said survey unto James Innis of Lancaster County…” Now granted to James Innis the lands “contained within ye aforesaid survey excepting ye lands already granted “. [Northern Neck Grants Book 3, page 34.]

He sold this back to Carter two months later for a pittance — see 29 July 1704.  Yet another example of Robert Carter acquiring vast tracts of land in other people’s names.

2 June 1704
Land Grant: Andrew Jackson, 908 acres in Richmond County.  Beginning at two marked red and white oaks at the northernmost corner of a tract of land surveyed for Mr. James Innis… line of John Waugh… [Northern Neck Grants Book 3, page 30.]

3 June 1704
Land Grant: Capt. Alexander Swan of Lancaster County, 1200 acres in Richmond County on Rocky Penn Run and Rappahanock River “beginning at a white oak standing nigh ye main run of Rappahanock River ye said white oak is ye westernmost corner tree of a tract of land surveyed for Mr. James Innis…”  also adjoining a survey for Andrew Jackson and the land of John Waugh. [Northern Neck Grants Book 3, page 31.]

4 July 1704
Deposition: Inquest into the murder of John Ball at a court held 4 July 1704:
“After this Doctor James Innis aged 39 yeares being Summoned to give his Evidence on behalf of ye Queen appeared at Barr and answered to ye following Interogatories upon oath Vizt:
Q: How came you to be at Jno. Bush his house when Jno. Sandall was taken out of his Grave
A:  I was summoned by the Constable to attend a Jurry and view ye body of Jno. Sandall.
Q: Did you see and wounds about him whereby he might come by his death
A: I see noe wounds but a considerable bruise in his groin and another in the side & some small holes on his back parts which I suppose to be occasioned by bruises.
Q: How long had ye Corps been in ye ground before it was taken up
A: above Eleven days as they told me”
[Lancaster County Order Book 5, page 89-90.]

This places James Innis’s birth about 1665. Note that the usual “or thereabouts” was not appended to the age. John Bush was accused of beating his servant John Sandall to death.  He was indicted and released on a £1,000 bond for his appearance at his trial at the General Count.   

17 July 1704
Deed: James Innis of Lancaster County to Leonard Howson (of Northumberland County), 147 acres in Wicco. parish.  Mrs. Katherine Innis, wife of James  [Restatement of:  Beverley Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. 19, Northumbria Collectanea, pages 91 and 92, abstracting Northumberland County Record Book 17, p255.]

19 July 1704
Mr. James Innis & Kath his wife ack. Deed of Indenture for a parcel of Land by Henry Mayze to Capt. Leond. Howson.  [Duvall, page 71 referencing Northumberland County Court Orders #5, page 302.]

Fleet also abstracts the 13 December 1704 will of Capt. Leonard Howson as referencing “land lately bought of James Innis on page 84.  This appears to be the same land he bought of Henry Mayes in 1702.  

29 July 1704
Deed: James Innis of Lancaster County to Robert Carter Esq. of same, for £2 good and lawful money of England, 11,128 acres in Stafford and Richmond Counties originally a survey for 16,215 acres (the same land granted to him on 1 June 1704). Signed: James Innis. Witness: John Babe, Thomas Inglish, John Howard. Katherine Innis relinquished dower.   [Richmond County Deed Book 3, pp 157.]

10 August 1704
Deed: James Innis of Lancaster County to Robert Carter Esq. of same, for £2 good and lawful money of England, 624 acres in Richmond County (same as the grant to Innis of 10 March 1703/4).  Signed: James Innis. Witness:Alex’er Swan, Wm. Jones, John Babe. Katherine Innis relinquished dower.   [Richmond County Deed Book 3, pp 159.]

10 August 1704
Deed: James Innis of Lancaster County to Robert Carter Esq. of same, for £5 good and lawful money of England, 628 acres in Richmond County (same as the grant to Innis of 10 March 1703/4).  Signed: James Innis. Witness: A. Swan, Wm. Jones, John Babe. Katherine Innis relinquished dower.   [Richmond County Deed Book 3, pp 161.]

21 August 1704
Land Grant: James Story of Richmond County adjacent to James Innis.  [Northern Neck Grants Book 3, page 41.]

8 November 1704
Tithables, Christ Church parish:   James Innis – 4
[Lancaster County Order Book 5, page 108.]

3 March 1704/5
Land Grant: George Mason, 79 acres in Stafford County by a warrant dated 17th of August last…  Signed: James Innis Clk of the propret’rs office.  Recorded 11 June 1707. [Stafford County Will Book Z 1699-1709, pages 373-4.  Courtesy of Anne Goodwin. The grant is in Northern Neck Grants Book 3, page 88.]

Has James Innis been clerk of the Fairfax land office all this time since 1694?

3 August 1705
Land Grant. James Innis, 104 acres… “Whereas James Innis of the County of Lancaster hath suggested to our Office that there is a certain Island belonging to us in the River of Rappahanock containing 73 acres of land flying about a mile above the lower falls of the said River as also 31 acres of land on the north side thereof Lying between th eLands of Martha Vicaris and James Story which is not yet granted…”  [Northern Neck Grants Book 3, page 107.]

James Innis sold this grant to Robert Carter a year later for a relative pittance.    

12 December 1705
Tithables, Christ Church parish:  James Innis – 4
[Lancaster County Order Book 5, page 138.]

This is the last list on which James Innis appears.  He was not tithable in the 14 November 1706 list or in subsequent years. Note that he was “of Lancaster in the August 1705 grant as well.  He must have moved to Richmond County sometime in the latter part of 1705 or the first few months of 1706. (Tithables were assembled “as of” 10 June of each year.)

6 October 1706
Deed: James Innis of Lancaster County to Robert Carter Esq. of same, for £2 good and lawful money of England, all his right title and interest in and to 104 acres in Richmond County (an island of 73 acres and another 41 acres) being granted unto the said James Innis by deed from the Proprietor’s Office bearing date 3 August 1705…”  Signed: James Innis. Witness: Will. Oasler, Henry Armistead.  Acknowledged in court on 5 February 1706/7 by Nathaniel Pope, attorney of James Innis.    Memorandum signed by James Innis 28 January 1706/7 declaring that he transferred possession of the property by delivery of turf and twig, witnessed by John Doyle, Charles Cale, Peter (his mark) Waterson.  Appointment of Nathan Pope of Westmoreland County as attorney signed by James Innis.  [Richmond County Deed Book 4, pages 89-90.]

Perhaps a new clerk of court in Richmond?  This and subsequent deeds are in a different form than the deeds of a couple years earlier. Marmaduke Beckwith did not become clerk until 1708.

18 October 1706
Deed: George Crosby of Northumberland County to Tobias Purcell of Lancaster County, for £150, 315½ acres in St. Stephens parish where Crosby lives adjacent land of Edward Sanders, Wm. Nutt, Christopher Newton and Geo. Nicholls – part of a patent to Richard Aylett of 22 April 1659 and by Aylett assigned to Daniel Crosby father of said George 30 July 1662.  Witness: James Innis, Tho. Routt, Tho. Hooper.  [Restatement for clarity of:  Beverley Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. 19, Northumbria Collectanea, page 30, abstracting Northumberland County Record Book 17, p192.  Referenced also in Fleet, pages 81 and 92.]

Seems to confirm that Thomas Hooper and James Innis knew one another well before Hooper married Sarah Innis.  

28 January 1706/7
Dower Release:  Whereas my husband James Innis hath sold unto Robert Carter… I the said Katherine Innis do hereby relinquish and quit claim to to any title of dower I might have in the said land… Signed: Katherine Innis. Witness: Thos. Walter, Jon. Doyle. Proved 5 February 1706/7 by the oaths of the witnesses. [Richmond County Deed Book 4, page 90a.]

21 December 1709
Land Grant. James Innis 333 acres. “Whereas James Innis of ye County of Richmond… did on the 9th Day of Nov’er last obtain a Warrant… survey as followeth, vizt: Beginning at a marked white oak saplin in ye line of Martha Vicaris… east southeast over the Fall Run along ye said Vicaris her line…   N66W up ye sd. Fall Run to ye land of Robert Carter Esq…. to ye land of  Richard Chichester Esq… & warrant 9 November last. [Northern Neck Grants Book 3, page 233.]

25 December 1709
Will: I, James Innis of the County of Richmond in Virginia being sick of body but of sound memory do make this my last will and testament…. “I give to my daughter Sarah, all my land lying beyond the main run that runs up to Mr. Jacksons plantation being bounded by the said run the River and the land of Mr. Jackson & Coll. Carter to her and her heirs forever. Item: I give unto my said daughter Sarah the molatto child moll, one feather bed with its furniture and three cowes.” Item: I give unto my Daughter Elizabeth the land I took up lately on the fall run and to her heirs forever I give her also two cowes and 1,000 pounds tobacco. Item: I give unto my Daughter Hannah one cowe and 500 pounds of Tobacco. Item. I give unto my son Enoch the plantation where I now dwell with all the lands thereunto belonging beginning at the mouth of the run on the river side running up the said run to the fork then up the eastern branch of the said run through the plantation to the first little house, thence up the western branch of the said run in a direct line to the northwest corner of my land, being a red and a white oake, near a great Rock, to him and his heirs forever. Item. To my son James I give all the remainder of my land lying between the said eastern branch the main run and Mr. Jacksons land, to him and to his heirs forever. Item. My will is that the said land be rented out till he becomes to the age of eighteen years with conditions of planting orchards building and leaving it tenantable.
Item. My will is that all the rest of my estate be equally divided between my son Enoch and my son James and that if either of them dye before they come of age that the survivor have the whole unless they have children. Item. I appoint my daughter Sarah to execute this my last will and testament and do order and appoint her to set my servant Hugh Mateer free two years before his full time by the judgment of the Court be out. In witness whereof I have set my hand and seale to this my last will and testament. Signed: James Innis. Witness: John (his H sign) Hust, Jean (by squiggley sign) Hust, John (his B sign) Bartholomew Junr.

Added below signatures on same date:
Item My will is that if either of my sons dye before he come of age and leave noe children then I give the land given to him to the survivor and his heirs forever, and if they should both dye before they come of age, or have children then I give all the said lands to my daughter Sarah and her heirs forever. Lastly I give my Gray horse to my wife. In witness whereof I have sett my hand and seale to this last clause of my will the 25th day of December, 1709. Signed: James Innis. Same witnesses.
Proved in Richmond County Court the 6th day of December, 1710 by Hust and Bartholomew. [Richmond County Wills & Inventories 1709-1717, pp31-32.]

Sarah Innis is evidently of age and already widowed, thus a fee sole.  Executors could be as young as 18, but that was rare since some actions could not be performed by minors.

Enoch Innis inherited from his brother James, who died without issue, and sold the plantation to Robert Carter in 1728.

Sarah and her third husband George Rust sold her inherited 275 acres, part of the 1 June 1704 patent, to her brother Enoch Innis on 4 September 1730. (See Hooper records for details.).   

— July 1710
Marriage License: “Thomas Hooper of Lancaster County & Sarah Price, widow…the above [list of marriage licenses dated by month and year] is a just & true account of what Marryage Lycenses have issued out of my Office since the 19th Day of Jany 1709… Given under my hand the Seventh Day of May 1716, Signed: Marmaduke Beckwith Cl. R. Cur.
[Richmond County Deed Book 6, unpaginated but last page of book. A terrific find by Anne Goodwin.]

Marmaduke Beckwith was clerk of the Richmond County court for forty years, from 1708 to 1748. Sarah Price was, from later records, the daughter of James Innis.

6 December 1710
Probate Awarded & Appraisal Ordered: Will of James Innis proved “and upon the motion of the Executrix therein named a Probate is granted her of the said will… Daniel Merritt, Thomas Walters, Thomas (Deckers?), John McNefee & Thomas Fitzhugh or any four of them being first sworn before a Justice of the Peace of this County, are appointed to appraise the Estate of James Innis deced., and make report thereof, to the next Court, when the Executrix is to produce the Inventory of the Estate and make Oath thereto. [Richmond County Order Book 5, p219.]

3 May 1711
Court Order: The order for appraisement of the estate of James Innis dec’d not being complied with, on motion made on behalf of the Executrix of the said deced. it is hereby continued and ordered that it be performed by (the same five names) [Richmond County Order Book 5, p274.]

4 July 1711
Court Order: Upon the motion of Katherine Innis, ordered that Thomas Hooper & Katherine (sic!) his wife Executrix of James Innis dec’d. be summoned to (smudged — present the inventory and appraisal) [Richmond County Order Book 5, p301.]

2 August 1711
Court Order: Thomas Hooper being summoned to appear at this Court and return an inventory and appraisment of the estate of James Innis deced., and failing therein, it is ordered that the Sheriff of this County take the said Thomas Hooper into his custody… [Richmond County Order Book 5, p316.]

4 January 1711/12
Thomas Hooper and Katherine (sic!) his wife Exec’x of James Innis dec’d being summoned to appear at this Court and show cause why did not returne an inventory and appraisment of the estate of said deced., Thomas Hooper appearing moved that persons more proper than those appointed for that purpose in the former order may now be appointed to appraise the estate in money, whereupon the Court do order and appoint Capt. Alex’r Doniphan, Wm. Thornton, Tho. Fitzhugh, Jonathan Gibson and James Strother, Gent., or any four of them… The said Alex’r Doniphan or such other Justice is also requested to administer an Oath to the said Thomas Hooper and Katherine (sic!) his wife for their true discovery of the Estate. [Richmond County Order Book 5, p331.]

Next Entry, Same Court: Daniell McCarty Attorney for and on behalfe of Robert Carter, Esq’r., produceing to this Court an account against the estate of James Innis, dec’d., for £82:10:9½ and 2,049 pounds of tobbo; and Thomas Hooper who intermarryed w’h the Exe’x. of the deced., appearing and acknowledging the same to be justly due, att motion of sd. Daniell McCarty, Judgment is granted to the said Robert Carter, Esq’r. against the Estate of James Innis in the hands of the said Thomas Hooper and Katherine (sic!) his wife, Executrix as aforesaid, for the said summes of £82:10:9½ and 2,049 pounds of tobbo; and costs [Richmond County Order Book 5, p332.]

Clerk again has substituted the widow’s name for the executrix’s.

26 February 1711/12
Inventory & Appraisal: of James Innis dec’d presented by Mr. Tho. Hooper and Sarah his wife and recorded 10 March 1711/12. [Richmond County Wills & Inventories 1709-1717, p63]

Will add details later.  Not much of interest, no debts listed. Total value £183:7:6.  At least the clerk got wife’s name right.