Richard Hulse (? – 1770) Records – New Jersey & Virginia

These are records that relate to the Richard Hulse who died in Frederick County, Virginia in 1770, and to his family members.

14 September 1740
Inventory: Thomas Layton of Lower Freehold, Monmouth Co., Inventory of thee estate… made by John Williams, John and Thomas Layton.
16 September 1740
“Bond of Joseph Williams and Peter Romyn (sic), of Lower Freehold township, yeomen, as administrators. John Williams and Lawrence Vanclieffe, of same place, yeomen, fellow bondsmen. (Joseph Williams, having married Sarah, and Peter Romyne married Rachel, daughters of the deceased).”
[As abstracted in Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, First Series, Vol. 30, “Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Administrations, Etc. 1730-1750”.p293.]

Parent of Sarah WiIliams, probably the same person as Mary Williams’ mother and Richard Hulse’s mother-in-law..

A secondary source gives Thomas Layton’s father as William Layton and suggests that his wife may have been named Lydia. [John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, “Early Settlers of New Jersey and their Descendants”, Vol. V (New York, 1932), pp1-2.]

23 August 1746
Inventory: Joseph Williams of Upper Freehold, Mommouth Co., Int(estate). Inventory includes male negro child £5; negro man £38. Made by Thomas Leonard and John Ashton. [As abstracted in Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, First Series, Vol. 32, “Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Administrations, Etc. 1730-1750”.p532.]
8 September 1746
Sarah Williams, widow, renounces her right of administration in favor of her brother-in-law John Williams of Amboy. [As abstracted in Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, First Series, Vol. 32, “Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Administrations, Etc. 1730-1750”.p532.]
26 September 1746
Bond of John Williams, of Freehold, as administrator, brother of intestate. Robert Savage of Freehold and James Willson, of Perth Amboy, fellow bondsmen.
[As abstracted in Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, First Series, Vol. 32, “Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Administrations, Etc. 1730-1750”.p532.]

This seems very likely to have been the same widowed Sarah Williams (ne Layton) who gave permission for her daughter Mary to wed Richard Hulst in 1751.  All three items are abstracted as a unit in the referenced source.

25 May 1751
Marriage License: Richard Hulst and Mary Williams, at Monmouth, NJ. Permission by mother Sarah Williams. [“New Jersey, County Marriages 1682-1956″, familysearch.org Film #00802938. Also abstracted at “New Jersey Marriages, 1678-1985”, database, FamilySearch.]

Note that only a widow or other feme sole guardian could give permission and that Mary must have been under twenty-one in order to require it. (New Jersey did not lower the age of consent to 18 until 1795.)

27 May 1751
Marriage License: Richard Hulst, Monmouth and Mary Williams, Monmouth.  [Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, Vol. XXII “Marriage Records 1660-1800” (Paterson, NJ, 1900), listed under “Males” on p188 and under “Females” on p455.]

Unless we have an amazing coincidence Richard Hults of New Jersey is the same person as Richard Hulse who died in Frederick County, Virginia in 1770.

Note that the two secondary sources give different dates but characterize the event as a license rather than a return.

27 May 1751
Marriage Bond: [to be inserted – on order from New Jersey Archives

This is on order in the hope that it renders a signature or mark that can be compared to those recorded in Frederick County, Virginia.]

Note: There do not appear to be any deeds in Monmouth County, New Jersey to or from Richard Hulse, Joseph Williams, Sarah Williams, or Mary Williams.

14 October 1753
William Hulse, son of Richard Hulse, born [Court record of 8 November 1770, see below]

15 March 1754
Quitclaim Deed: Samuel Swanson to Richard Mount, both of Frederick County, Virginia, for £14 “pensilvany currency”, assigns his rights to a tract “adjoyning to ye River of Potomack above William Williams land and Daniel Osmond land”. Signed: Samuel Swanson. Witness: William (his x mark) Williamson Jr., Richard Hulse.  [Part of Survey File for Ebenezer Brewster — Item 3&4 in file online at Library of Virginia as image.lva.virginia.gov/LONN/NN-1/226/0353_0360.pdf]

Is this the same Richard Hulse who died in 1770?  If so, he must have moved very soon after his marriage. Note that he signed his own name whereas Richard “Hults” of New Jersey signed at least one document by mark..

Samuel Swanson obtained a warrant dated 25 September 1752 (the 25th year of George II’s reign, see the item in the same file) and is here assigning it to Richard Mount. Richard Mount had it surveyed in 1755 and later assigned it to Ebenezer Brewster who received a patent for the land in 1761, Both Richard Hulse and Josiah Hulse figured in these transfers.

30 March 1755
Survey for Richard Mount of 118 acres on Potomac River adjacent to Daniel Osborn, surveyed by Thos. Rutherford. Chain carriers: Daniel Osborn & Thos. Williamson. [Part of Survey File for Ebenezer Brewster — Item 5 in file online at Library of Virginia as image.lva.virginia.gov/LONN/NN-1/226/0353_0360.pdf]

This land was originally claimed by Samuel Swanson who assigned his warrant to Richard Mount. (see above).   This is included in the file because Josiah Hulse partially financed the purchase of this grant by Ebenezer Brewster and Richard Hulse witnessed the transfer from Mount to Brewster.

ca1755
James Hulse, son of Richard Hulse, born [Pension Application — see separate webpage]

The statements in the pension file conflict regarding his birth  His 1819 deposition states that he was in his 63rd year in September 1819 — which implies that he was been born in late 1756 or early to mid 1757.  The 1821 deposition states that he was aged 66 in June 1821 — implying a birth in late 1754 or early 1755.  Yet if Richard Hulse’s children were listed in birth order in his will, James Hulse was the fourth child.

His modern-day gravestone carries a birth date of 1757.  Many internet postings give him a birth date of 10 May 1759 — which would have made him 60, not 63, in 1819 and 62, not 66, in 1821.

The only one of his children to live long enough to be counted in the 1880 census gave both her parents’ birthplaces as “Pennsylvania”.

9 April 1759
Assignment: written on the 30 March 1755 survey:  I the said Mount signed over the with(sic) wright___ of of (sic) land to Ebenezer Brewster for a consideration, as witness my hand in the presence of Samuel Swanson, Richard Hulse.  Signed: Richard Mount. [Part of Survey File for Ebenezer Brewster — Item 5 in file online at Library of Virginia as image.lva.virginia.gov/LONN/NN-1/226/0353_0360.pdf]

See bond dated same day (below)

9 April 1759
Bond (Promissory Note):  Ebenezer Brewster of Frederick County bound to pay to Richard Mount of Frederick County £18:12 “pensalveney money” on or before the 25 day of December next ensuing.  Signed: Ebenezer Brewster. Witness: Samuel Swanson, Richard Hulse. [Part of Survey File for Ebenezer Brewster — Item 6 in file online at Library of Virginia as image.lva.virginia.gov/LONN/NN-1/226/0353_0360.pdf]

See 1 December 1761 and 19 June 1765 below.  Richard Hulse and Josiah Hulse were both involved in this transaction. Note: As per custom, the actual bond amount (£37:4) was twice the amount owed.

Note that this person signed his name, whereas the Richard Hulse who wrote his will in 1770 used an “RH” mark.

18 May 1761
Poll taken at the Election of Burgesses, Frederick County… (Voting for) Col. Geo. Washington… Josiah Hultz…  [Murtie J. Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 1732-1774 (Genealogical Publishing Co., 1999), p549.]

Richard Hulse is apparently not living in Frederick County, Virginia.

9 August 1765
Inventory of Peter Wilson of Freehold, Monmouth Co., yeoman…”made by John van der Veer and Richard Hulst.”  [As abstracted in Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, First Series, Vol. 32, “Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Administrations, Etc. 1730-1750”.p363]

According to the same secondary source, Peter Wilson’s widow Hannah resigned her right to administration on 26 July 1765 in favor of her uncles William Waters and William Hankinson and friend John Anderson.  T hose three “all of Freehold” made bond on 28 July 1765 with Joseph Taylor and John van der Veer bondsmen.

16 August 1765
Will: of Joseph Morford, of Township of Freehold, Monmouth County, proved by witnesses Peter Schenk, Richard Hults, and James Robinson. August 21, 1765… [As abstracted in Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, First Series, Vol. 33, “Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Administrations, Etc. 1761-1770”.p295 and repeated in Stillwell, p4.]

…”Witnesses (to will):  Peter Schenk, Richard Hults, [his mark],  and James Robinson.”  [added by John E. Stillwell, Historical and Genealogical Miscellany, “Early Settlers of New Jersey and their Descendants”, Vol. iV (New York, 1916), p4.]

–>Need to obtain the orginal to check he precise nature of the signature mark.

23 July 1770
In the Name of God Amen I Richard Hulse of Frederick County Province of Virginia being Weak in Body but of sound & Perfect Mind & Memory Blessed be God for the same do made[sic] and Publish this my Last Will and Testament that (is to say) first I allow all my Lawful Estate as also my Funeral Expenses. I also give unto my beloved Mary Hulse all the Remainder of my Estate as long as she shall remain a Widow Except what is hereafter Mentioned. I Will and Bequeath unto my son William Hulse a Mare and Saddle & Bridle when he shall arrive at age & to Live with his Mother until that time as also all my cloaths. I also Allow that my son Joseph Hulse & James Hulse be Put out to Trades, but if the said Mary Hulse does not Continue a Widow but Marrys again that then I do Will that my Estate shall be Equally Divided Between the said Mary Hulse & my children before mentioned Viz Wm. Hulse, Susanna Hulse, Joseph Hulse, James Hulse, Catharine Hulse, Easter Hulse & Mary Hulse. I do hereby Lastly appoint & Ordain Mary Hulse my beloved Wife my Sole Executrix of this my Last Will and Testament hereby Revoking all former Wills by me made. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my Hand & Seal the twenty third day of July in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven Hundred & Seventy.
Signed & sealed… Richard  [his “RH” mark] Hulse.  [Witness:] James Clark, Thomas Shepherd Junr., Wm. Shepherd.
[Frederick County Will Book 4, p44-45.]

The children are likely listed in birth order — note that the daughters are listed in this same order in the nuncupative will of Sarah Williams.  

The daughter Susannah Hulse (? – 17 November 1839) married Thomas Shepherd (c1743-1795), a brother of David, William, and Abraham Sheppard and is buried in the Shepherd burial ground in Shepherdstown. 

8 November 1770
At a Court Continued & held for Frederick County November 8th 1770 This Last Will and Testament of Richard Hulse Deceased was proved by the Oaths of the Witnesses thereto and ordered to be Recorded. The Executrix therein named being Dead upon the motion of Van Swearingen, who made Oath thereto Certificate is granted him for Obtaining Letters of Administration with the said Will annexed he giving Security Whereupon he together with John Wright & Josiah Swearingen his Securities entered into & Acknowledged a Bond in the Penalty of Five Hundred Pounds Conditioned for his due & faithful administration of the sd. Estate.
[Frederick County Will Book 4, p45-46. and Frederick County Order Book 15, 1770-1772, p56.]

Mary Hulse died sometime between July 1770 and November 1770, apparently leaving all the children truly orphaned.

The £500 bond (typically twice the estimated value of the estate) is quite small. Either Richard Hulse had almost no belongings or they were located outside Frederick County and thus not subject to this court’s jurisdiction.  The actual bond itself is not preserved among Frederick County records.

There does not seem to be any.relationship between Van Swearingen and either Richard Hulse or Sarah Williams. The Swearingens had been in Frederick County for more than thirty years — Van’s brother Thomas Swearingen operated the ferry at Shepherds Town (which was actually named Mecklenburg until 1798) and was the town’s sole trustee.  There were two men named Van Swearingen in the county at this time — uncle and nephew, both of whom lived at Shepherds Town.  The administrator of the estate was apparently the elder Van Swearingen (1719-1788). Note that he also took administration of the estate of Sarah Williams (see below). It is possible that Hulse and Williams were his tenants or debtors.  

8 November 1770
At a Court held for Frederick County… Ordered that David Shepherd, James Clarke, William Shepherd, & Thomas Shepherd Junr. or any three of them being first sworn do appraise the Slaves, if any, and the Personal Estate of Richard Hulse  dec’d… [Frederick County Order Book 15 ,1770-1772, p56.]

No inventory or appraisal is recorded in the will books — did the appraisers find no property in the county?  Appraisers were chosen from close neighbors who had no personal interest in the estate. This is a good indication that Richard Hulse lived in, or very near, Shepherdstown.

Where has Richard Hulse been for the last 16 years?  If that was him in the 1750s records, where has he been in the intervening sixteen years?  There are no records of him in Frederick County, Virginia.  Could he have been living across the Potomac river in Maryland? Or do we. have two different ]Richard Hulses?

8 November 1770
(Court date continued) Ordered that the Churchwardens do Bind out according to Law William Hulse of seventeen years of age the 14th day of October last to Patrick Donaldson who is to learn him to read write & cypher & the Trade of a Joiner.
Van Swearingen is appointed Guardian to Isaac Hults (sic), Catharine Hults, Esther Hults,, Mary Hults, and Susannah Hults orphans of Richard Hults dec’d until they obtain to Lawful Age he having given Bond with Security as the Law directs.
[Frederick County Order Book 15, 1770-1772, p59.]

William Hults was born 14 October 1753 according to this court record.  The other children are presumably not yet 14, the age at which they could choose their own guardian.  

Who was “Isaac”?  Curiously neither Joseph nor James is mentioned in this record, but one of the two was apparently mis-recorded as “Isaac”. That probably refers to James, who was bound out six months later (see below) rather than Joseph who is nowhere mentioned in court records. There is no mention here or later of Joseph Hulse, who may have died along with Richard Hulse, his wife Mary and mother-in-law Sarah Williams. Nevertheless, some descendants have claimed later records of a Joseph Hulse to apply to this person.

5 November 1770
The Deposition of William Shepherd being of Full age taken before me the subscriber one of his Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for the said County. The Deponent being first Sworn on the Holy Evangelists Deposeth & sayeth that on or about the tenth day of august Last he the Deponent being at the House of Richard Hulse in the said County was Called upon by one Sarah Williams who then Lay sick on her Death Bed & who Requested the Deponent & his Brother David Shepherd then Present to See that the following articles of her Estate should be given & Disposed of in the manner hereafter Mentioned. Thats to say, her Bed & furniture to be sold & the Money Arising from said sale to be given & applied toward the Support & Maintenance of her grand Daughter Mary Hulse being the Youngest (sic) of the Richard Hules[sic] – And that two gold Rings, Three Silver Spoons, Six Pewter Plates One Pewter Basin & 1 Pewter Dish or Platter should be sold and the Money arising from the sd. Sale to be Equally given & Divided Between her other grand Daughters Susanna Hules[sic], Catherine Hulse, & Hesther Hules[sic] Daughters of the above Mentioned Richard Hulse.  [Unsigned]
[Frederick County Will Book 4, p46.]

…the Deposition of David Shepherd being of full age… being first sworn… sayeth that on or about the tenth of August last he the Deponent being at the house of Richard Hulse in the said county was called upon by one Sarah Williams who then lay sick on her Death Bed who Requested the Deponent & his Brother  William Shepherd then present would see the following Articles of her Estate given & Disposed of in the manner here after mentioned Thats to say her Bed & furniture to be sold & the Money Arising from said sale to be given & applied toward the Maintenance of her grand Daughter Mary Hulse being the Youngest Daughter of the said Richard Hulses and that two gold Rings, three Silver Spoons, 6 Pewter Plates, One Pewter Bason and one Pewter Dish or Platter should be sold and the Money Arising from the said Sale to be Equally Divided & given to her other grand Children Susannah Hulse, Catherine Hulse, & Hester Hulse Daughters of the above Mentioned Richard Hulse. . . [Frederick County Will Book 4, p46.]

8(?) November 1770
At a Court Continued & held for Frederick County November 5th (sic) 1770 This Nuncupative will of Sarah Sheperd (sic) Deceased was Proved by the Oaths of William Shepherd and David Shepherd & their Depositions ordered to be Recorded and upon the Motion of Van Swearingen Administration with the said Nuncupative Will Annexed will annexed is granted him…. [Frederick County Will Book 4, p46.]

The same entry appears in both the Will Book and the Order Book (see below) but with a slightly different date and with the surname “Shepherd” erroneously entered. The two depositions call her Sarah Williams but the summary called her Sarah Shepherd.

9 November 1770
At a Court Continued & Held for Frederick County November 9th 1770… The Nuncupative will of Sarah Williams Deceased was proved by the oaths of William Shepherd & David Shepherd & their Depositions ordered to be Recorded and upon the Motion of Van Swearingen Administration with the will annexed is granted him…
[Frederick County Court Order Book 15, p61. and Will Book 4, p47.]

The fact that this was miswritten in the will book (but not in court records) led to the will being abstracted incorrectly in at least one secondary source authored by J. Estelle Stewart King.  Incidentally, I did not find the administrator’s bond among the records of Frederick County.

Ordered that David Shepherd, William Shepherd, Thomas Shepherd Junr., and James Clarke, being first sworn do appraise the Slaves, if any, and Personal Estate of Sarah Williams  dec’d & Report the value thereof to the Court.. [Frederick County Order Book 15, 1770-1772, p61.]

Note that the court entry clarifies that her name as “Shepherd” in the Will Book was a copying error by the clerk.  Was Sarah Williams the mother of Mary Hulse or could she have been the widowed-and-remarried mother of Richard Hulse?  Note that Sarah WIlliams made no specific mention of Mary being her daughter or of Richard being her son. I assume that it is partly upon this evidence that it is assumed that Richard Hulse was the same person who married in New Jersey in 1751.

David Shepherd (1734-1795) and William Shepherd (c1740-1824) were sons of Thomas Shepherd (c1705-1776) who founded Mecklenburg (renamed to Shepherd’s Town in 1798.)  They were also brothers of the Thomas Shepherd (Junior) who married Susannah Hulse and of Abraham Shepherd (1754-1822) who commanded the company in which James Hulse served in 1777. Van Swearingen and his brother Thomas, who operated the ferry across the river to Maryland, also lived at Shepherdstown.

No inventory or appraisal is recorded in the Will Books.

9 November 1770
Ordered that Van Swearingen pay David Shepherd fifty pounds tobacco for attending Court two days to Prove Williams Will. (Same for William Shepherd.). Ordered that Van Swearingen pay James Clarke fifty pounds tobacco for attending Court two days to Prove Hults Will. (Same for Thomas Shepherd Junr..). [Frederick County Order Book 15, 1770-1772, p62.]

8 May 1771
At a Court held for Frederick County… Ordered that the Churchwardens of Norborne parish do Bind out James Hults to Jeremiah Dungen till he come of Age, who is to learn him to Read Write & Cypher and the trade of a Mason.
Ordered that the Churchwardens of Norborne parish do Bind out Catherine Hults to George McNabb till she come of Age, who is to learn her to Read & Write.
Ordered that the Churchwardens of Norborne parish do Bind out Esther Hults to Van Swearingen till she come of Age, who is to learn her to Read & Write.
Ordered that the Churchwardens of Norborne parish do Bind out Mary Hults to John Mitchell till she come of Age, who is to learn her to Read & Write.
[Frederick County Order Book 15, 1770-1772, p190.]

10 February 1772
Berkeley County (now West Virginia) carved out of the northern portion of Frederick County.  Shepherdstown fell into Berkeley County as did Sleepy Creek so all Hulses are now in Berkeley County.

16 June 1772
On the petition of William Hults, infant, ordered that Patrick Donaldson his master be summoned to appear at the next court to answer the complaint of the said William Hults. [Berkeley County Order Book 1, p8. Also p64 and p104]

The son of Richard Hulse, now almost 19, had been bound out to Patrick Donaldson two years earlier. This case was continued at least three times to future courts and apparently dropped about the time William reached 21 and was freed.

1773
Marriage: Susannah Hulse & Thomas Shepherd.
[Samuel Gordon Smyth, A Genealogy of the Duke-Shepherd-Van Metre Family (1909), p223.]

Thomas Shepherd (Junior) was the brother of William and David Shepherd above, and also the brother of Abraham Shepherd under whom James Hulse served in the Revolution. According to this book Susannah remarried to a Brooke and is buried in the Shepherd burial ground. Find-a-Grave lists her married name as “Brook” and her date of death as 17 November 1839.

21 September 1773
Suit:  Van Swearingen, admin’r of Rich’d Hulse, against Joseph Cowenauer (Coughenour?), on Attachment. The garnishee Jonathan Seaman being sworn declared he hath Two Plough Irons, two Mattocks, two Large Bundles left at his House by a stranger and It is Ordered that this attachment be continued.  . [Berkeley County Order Book 1, p382.]

Details were not included, but Swearingen apparently was suing Cowenauer to recover property that had belonged to Richard Hulse.  Jonathan Seaman who apparently had some of the property, seems to have lived near Winchester, which was quite a long way from Shepherdstown to transport such heavy material.  Why was Richard Hulse’s plow located so far away?

19 October 1773
Suit:  Van Swearingen, adm’r of Richard Hulse vs. Joseph Cowenauer (Coughenour?) on attachment… case continued [Berkeley County Order Book 2, p59.]

16 November 1773
Suit:  Van Swearingen, adm’r of Richard Hulse vs. Joseph Cowenauer (Coughenour?) on attachment… Joseph Seaman, a garnishee in this attachment being sworn at a former Court declared that he had two plough irons, two mattocks, and two large bundles left at his house by a stranger and the plaintiff failing to appear to replevy the same tho solemnly called Therefore it is considered by the Court that the plaintiff recover against the said defendant £2:7:1 with interest thereon [at 5%] from 12 May 1770… and it is ordered that the Sheriff expose to sale the attached effects… and the money arising from such sale be applied towards the discharge of this judgment.  [Berkeley County Order Book 2, p97.]

This implies that Richard Hulse was a farmer rather than tradesman.  The value of the material is surprisingly low.

c1775?
Supposedly, Mary Hulse married Francis Daley according to a posting at family search.org.  I am so far unable to find supporting evidence – following John Mitchell, her master, might yield some proof. .

1775-6
Roster of Captain Hugh Stephenson’s Company of Riflemen: …William Hulse… [Willis F. Evans, History of Berkeley County, West Virginia (Heritage Books, 2007), p140. Apparently sourced from Dandridge, p88.]

The company was organized in Shepherdstown in June 1775 in response to the Continental Congress’s plea for militias to come to the aid of Boston.  It left the town in mid-July and arrived in Boston 24 days later.  The company served for a year.  The roughly 100 members of the company were predominantly residents in and around Shepherdstown.

1775
An Alphabetical List of Officers and Privates Connected with Shepherdstown… During the Revolution… “Hulse, Peter (sic). Enlisted in Captain Stephenson’s company in 1775. After the Revolution moved to Wheeling, where, in 1825, he was still living. He owned a ferry in that place.”  [Dandridge, p325.]

Dandridge separately lists the roster of Stephenson’s company for 1775-6 but the name there is “William Hulse”. And we have other record of William Hulse’s service, plus his later residence on the Ohio outskirts of Wheeling.  So the name “Peter” appears to be a misprint.

28 January 1777
James Hulse enlists in Company H, 12th Virginia Regiment at Shepherdstown, Berkeley County, Virginia. [H Company Pay Rolls, NARA records at www.fold3.com]

Company pay rolls and muster rolls exist for much of the 1777-1779 period.  According to a pay roll for June 1777 he was paid from day of enlistment, January 28, to last day of June 1777, amounting to five months and two days.  Although the company was initially commanded by Abraham Shepherd, it was commanded by Captain Joseph Mitchell in mid and late 1777, then by Captain Thomas Bowyer in December 1777, then by Major Jonathan Clark in mid-1778..

1777-1779
James Hulse Revolutionary War Service — see pension papers.  Several score monthly payrolls and muster rolls exist in NARA records confirming his service.

Muster rolls show him “sick in Virginia” in June 1777, sick on and off at Valley Forge from February through June  1778, sick at Yellow Spring in July 1778, at camp at “Robinson’s Farm in September 1778 and at Middleburg in late 1778,  His name is mostly spelled “Hulse” but also appears as Hulce, Hults, Huls, Hulls, and once as Hulsy.

In late 1779 the Regiment became the 8th Virginia. A muster roll of November 1779 at a camp “near Morristown (New Jersey)” his enlistment date was written as January 10, 1777.  The last muster roll shows him present in August 1779.

18 June 1778
Suit:  William Hulse vs. William Graham, upon replevy… the defendant saith that the Rent in the declaration mentioned is due and the plaintiff in reply saith that no Rent is due at which he is ready to aver… referred to next Court. [Berkeley County Order Book 3, p239.]

This is surely the eldest son of Richard Hulse, now aged 24.  Some internet posters claim him as a son of Josiah Hulse, apparently unaware that Richard Hulse had a son named William.

This suit was eventually settled out of court, for it was dismissed by agreement of the parties.

1 September 1780
Discharge: “Halifax 1 Sep’r 1780 Sergant William Hulse having served faithfully three years in the 3rd Reg’t of Light Dragoons is hereby discharged the sd Hulse is a man of Honesty and Integrity. (Signed) W. Washington, Lt. Coll. [Library of Virginia Rev. War Bounty Land Warrants, attached to warrant issued in 1783]

This is the son of Richard Hulse — see entry at 1783 below noting that his pay was received by Capt. Shepherd. He must not have served continuously as he was suing William Graham in Berkeley County in 1778 and 1779.

24 October 1783
A List of Soldiers of the Virginia Line on Continental Establishment who have received Certificates for the balance of there (sic) full pay… Sgt. William Hulse, Company H… £137:19:3…by whole Received: Capt. Shepherd.  [NARA Records, accessed at fold3.com]

1783
Personal Property Tax, Berkeley County
District 7:  Paul Hultz – 1 poll, 1 slave under 16, 3 horses, 7 cattle
District 7:  Robert Hultz – 1 poll, 1 slave under 16, 2 horses, 2 cattle
District 12:  William Hulse – 1 poll, 2 horses, 2 cattle

These tax lists are usually dated in the summer of the following year, but are for the year stated.  Note that Paul and Robert Hulse belong to a separate lineage.

1784
Personal Property Tax, Berkeley County
John Devenport’s District:  Paul Hulse – 1 poll, 3 horses, 7 cattle
John Devenport’s District:  Robert Hulse – 1 poll, 2 horses, 2 cattle
John Cooke’s District:  William Hulse – 1 poll, 2 horses, 2 cattle

1785
Personal Property Tax, Berkeley County
Peter Bryan Bruin’s District:  Elizabeth Hulse – no white polls, 1 slave, 1 horse, 2 cattle
Peter Bryan Bruin’s District:  Robert Hulse – 1 poll, 1 horse, 2 cattle
John Cooke’s District:  William Hultz – 1 poll, 5 horses, 1 cattle

1785 
Land Tax, Berkeley County 1st Battalion:
Paul Hulse – 125 acres & 141 acres
Elizabeth Hulse – 133 acres

1786
Personal Property Tax, Berkeley County
Peter Bryan Bruin’s District:  Robert Hulse – 1 poll, 2 horses, 2 cattle
John Kearsley’s District:  William Hulse – 1 poll, 5 horses, 2 cattle
William Little’s District:  William Hulse – 1 poll, 2 horses, 1 cattle

Paul Hulse is missing this year, and is not among those added later by the court.  Was he the first “William” Hulse above?  Or was he elsewhere? or taxed to someone else? 

The two William Hulse’s may be the same person counted twice. John Kearsley lived near Sheperdstown, as did William Little.

1787
Personal Property Tax, Berkeley County, 1st Battalion:
Paul Hulse – 2 males> 21 (Paul Hulse, Elisha Meeks), 3 horses, 4 cattle
Robt. Hulse – 1 male>21, 2 horse, 2 cattle
Personal Property Tax, Berkeley County, 2nd Battalion:
William Hulse – 1 male>21, 1 horse, 3 cattle

1788
Personal Property Tax, Berkeley County, 1st Battalion:
Paul Hulse – 5 horses
Robt. Hulse – 2 horses

William Hulse is missing this year, has evidently left the area to move to the vicinity of Wheeling.  The format of the tax list changed significantly this year, listing horses and white males over 21.

29 September 1792
Will: Thomas Shepherd of Berkeley County… I do allow my wife Susannah the sum of forty pounds Pennsylvania currency to be paid to her yearly and every year for the support of herself and children during her natural life and do also give her one half of my swelling house and one half of the gardens thereto belonging… my sons Thomas, David, John , Joseph, and James…all my then living children… constitute Coll. John Morrow and Coll. Joseph Swearingen my Trusty friends executors of this my last will and testament…  Signed: Thos. Shepherd. Witness: William Buckles, Jno Brown, William Hulse.  Proved on 16 October 1792 by Buckles and on 17October 1792 by Morrow.  [Berkeley County Will Book 2, pp151.]

1793
Personal Property Tax List, Berkeley County, 1st Battalion:
Robert Huls – 1 poll, no horses
Personal Property Tax List, Berkeley County, 2nd Battalion:
William Hulse – 1 poll, 2 horses

1794
Personal Property Tax List, Berkeley County, 1st Battalion:
Robert Huls – 1 poll, 2 horses
Personal Property Tax List, Berkeley County, 2nd Battalion:
William Hulse – 1 poll, 2 horses

This is the last year in which William Hulse was taxed in Berkeley County.


See the file of records relating to James Hulse for more on that son of Richard Hulse, as well as his Revolutionary Was pension applications.