Munday records in Old Rappahannock & Essex County, Virginia 1669-1720


These are my own abstracts of the original records unless otherwise indicated. I have omitted several post-1700 records that seem to have no genealogical value and I have summarized some other records of limited genealogical value.  I’ve added explanatory comments in blue italic for records that seem to have genealogical or historical value.


1656
Rappahannock County was founded in 1656 from part of Lancaster County. It existed for only 36 years until 1692 when it was divided into Essex County and Richmond County.  Its records were inherited by Essex County. It is referred to as “Old” Rappahannock to differentiate it from a different county named Rappahannock that was established in 1833.

29 August 1669
Power of Attorney: Rebecca (x) Tandy, by virtue of a letter of attorney from her husband Henry Tandy, appoints Henry Crighton her attorney to collect debts due to her husband Henry Tandy.  Witness: Thomas Munday, Rich’d Taylor. [Old Rappahannock County Deeds & Wills Book 4, p186.]

This is Thomas Munday’s first known appearance in Virginia records. He may already be living on the Daingerfield tract adjacent to the Tandys which he will purchase almost two years later. Henry Tandy had acquired his land, 868 acres, from John Dangerfield.

4 January 1670/71
Deed: John Daingerfield & Ann his wife agree to sell to Thomas Munday 500 acres adjacent to Henry Tandy …”when the land shall be surveyed”.. [Old Rappahannock County Deeds & Wills Book 4, p363.]

The deed for the surveyed tract was four months later. 

5 May 1671
Deed: Jno. Daingerfield & Anne his wife to Henry Monkester, 300 acres “lying & being in the County of Rappa. & Pish. of Sittingbourne on the north side of the Mill Creeke whereon ye sd. Monkester now liveth… Signed: John Daingerfield, Ann (her mark) Daingerfield.  Witness: Henry Tandy, Tho. Munday.   [Old Rappahannock County Deeds & Wills Book 4, p468]

Does he have some relationship to Henry Munkester? In 1701 when his heir was in question, three people deposed that Henry Monkester and his brother James were from Edmonton in Middlesex County, England and that they had initially lived together on the tract adjacent to Thomas Munday before James went to Maryland. 

3 June 1671
Deed: Jno. Daingerfield, Cooper, & Anne his wife to Thomas Munday, carpenter, all of Rappahannock, for 8,000 pounds tobacco, 500 acres scittuate & being in ye County of Rappa. and Pish. of Sittingbourne beginning at two marked trees an oake pochicarie & runing N by E ½ E 288 [poles] to a marked Spn. Oake and thence E by S ½ S 434 poles to a red oake the corner tree of Henry Munkester & thence by the said land 208 [poles] to ye maine Branch of yt Mill Creek S by W ½ W & thence W by N ½ N 434 pole to ye first mentioned Station it being a pt of a greater quantity purchased of Major John Weire…  Signed:  John Daingerfield, Ann (her mark) Daingerfield.  Witness: John Exam, Hen’y Aubery.  Ann Daingerfield appoints Henry Tandy her attorney to acknowledge her release in sale to Thomas Munday.  [Old Rappahannock County Deeds & Wills Book 4, p363 and 452]

Mill Creek, usually called Gilson’s Creek in Essex records, is today known as Mount Landing Creek. It flows roughly east by southeast to empty into the Rappahannock River about three miles above Tappahannock.  Henry Tandy’s land also bordered Mill (Gilson’s) Creek.

3 July 1671
Release: Ann (her mark) Daingerfield appoints Henry Tandy her attorney to acknowledge her release in sale of land to Henry Munkester.  Witness: Henry Arbery, Thomas Munday [Old Rappahannock County Deeds & Wills Book 4, p463.]

14 October 1672
Land Patent: Robert Parker, 150 acres in Rappahannock County between Mill Creek and the river. adjacent to John Smith, Nicholas Cattlett, Henry Munkaster or Tho. Munday, for transportation of three persons. [Virginia Patent Book 6, p424.]

22 April 1673
Witness: Thomas Munday & Nathaniel Ayres witness Mary Sullivant’s appointment of an attorney to relinquish her dower in a sale by Daniel Sullivant to John Martin. [Old Rappahannock County Deeds & Wills Book 5, p164.]

23 August 1673
Deed: Henry Muncaster of Sittingbourne Parish, cooper, to Caleb Lyon of the same, 100 acres being part of a parcel of land formerly bought of John Daingerfield… on the north side of the Mill Creeke in the county and parish aforesaid lying together at the upper end of the said tract towards the land of Thomas Munday and butting thereon…  Signed: Henry Muncaster.  Witness: Edmund Crask, John Prosser. Mary Muncaster relinquished dower.  [Old Rappahannock County Deeds & Wills Book 5, p182 and also see p375.]

He has 200 acres left, which his nephew will sell to Thomas Munday in 1700.

18 November 1673
Deed: Nicholas Catlett & wife Elizabeth to Samuel Bloomfield, part of land on which he now lives bounded by Thomas Monday, John Williamson, Peter Johnson. [Old Rappahannock County Deeds & Wills Book 5, p192.]

14 October 1672
Land Patent: Robert Parker, 150 acres in Rappahannock between Mill Creek and the river. adjacent to John Smith, Nicholas Cattlett, Henry Munkaster or Tho. Munday, for transportation of three persons. [Virginia Patent Book 6, p424.]

14 September 1678
Deed: Robert Thomlin (Tomlin) to Thomas Monday, both of Sittingbourne parish and Essex County, part of the 100 acres of land formerly purchased of Caleb Lyon by me (being formerly bought by Lyon of Henry Moncaster and part of the land Moncaster bought of John Daingerfield) and being that part that lieth on the west side of the branch ___ pt. to the now dwelling house of the above mentioned Monday… all the land that lithe from the mouth of the aforesaid branch to the road?… Signed: Robert (his mark) Tomlin. Witness:Wm. Gammack?, Wm. Gande? [Old Rappahannock County Deeds & Wills Book 6, p64.]

This is difficult to read on film, so I didn’t spend much time on the content. See the item at 2 June 1680 for the sale of the other part of this tract, also mentioning Thomas Monday.

26 December 1678
Stock mark:  Thomas Munday registers his eare mark for cattle & hogs “a crop in both ears & a slit in the right”. [Old Rappahannock County Deed Book 6, p53.  Also apparently in Order Book 1677-1682, p193.]

20 November 1679
Thomas Munday & John (x) Chooke witness a covenant by Henry Arbery.  [Old Rappahannock County Deeds & Wills Book 6, p103.]

2 June 1680
Deed: Robert Tomlin to John Bonner [the rest of the 100 acre tract above — spelling modernized] on the north side of Mill Creek Swamp which sd. part of the land is part of a parcel of land formerly sold by Henry Moncaster unto Caleb Lyons & by Caleb Lyons unto Robert Tomlin & bounded upon a branch running between the land of Thomas Monday & the now bargained premises… [Old Rappahannock County Deeds & Wills Book 6, p112.]

6 February 1683/4
Court Order: It is ordered that Thomas Munday and Randall Peters be paid by Mr. Jno. Waters and Henry Boughan? for the ___ and loss of time in going to view a house of the said Waters and that the said Peters be paid for five days attendance and the said Munday for two days attendance. [Old Rappahannock County Court Orders, item 1 of LDS Film #007673131, uncertain volume, p3.].

2 April 1684
Court Order [spelling partially modernized]: It is ordered that Mr. Jno. Jones be surveyor of the highways this ensuing year in the place and stead of Henry Woodruff… and Mr. Edward Keeling in the place and stead of Thomas Munday… [Old Rappahannock County Court Orders 1683-1686, p21.].County Court Orders 1683-1686 (item 1 of LDS Film #007673131), p17.].

2 April 1684
Court Order [spelling partially modernized]: At a court held for Rappahannock County on the South side of the river 2 April 1684… It did appear that Thomas Munday was imprest in County’s service with himself and horse by the order of Col.. Jno. Stone to bring down corn & timber belonging to the Rappa. Indians from their fort to the river side in which service he was employed seven days for satisfaction whereof is referred to the Assembly. [Old Rappahannock County Court Orders 1683-1686, p21.].

He was one of about three dozen men so impressed into service. See next entry below.

16 April 1684
At a General Assembly Begun at James Citty… These following Orders of Publique Charge and Levy were made; Rappahannock County: to Tho. Munday for seven days – 00169 (lbs tobacco) [Journal of the House of Burgesses 1659/60-1693, p253.]

16 June 1684
Thomas Munday an appraiser of the estate of Henry Munkester. [Old Rappahannock County Order Book 1677-1682, p41 and Book 1683 -1686, p28.]

Henry Munkester did not leave a will, but he executed a deed of gift of cattle to an unmarried daughter named Rebecca and a son named Henry in 1682.  Both of these children must have died sometime in the next 18 years, because his land was inherited by his eldest brother’s eldest son. 

2 December 1685
Vantrump[?] a Negro slave to Thomas Monday by his sd. master being presented to this court to have ___ into his age is adjudged at ten years old. ordered to be levy free until he arrives to the full age… [Old Rappahannock County Court Orders 1683-1686, p182.]

An Act of Assembly in 1680 had made Negro children, male and female, taxable at the age of 12.  The age was raised to 16 in 1705.

1 June 1687
Court Order: The Sheriff having lawfully summoned Wm. Young, Tho. Monday, Jno. Waters & Henry Pickett amongst others to attend the Court as jurors… and not appearing, the Court for the sd. Contempt have fined [them each] 250 pounds [of tobacco]. [Old Rappahannock County Court Orders 1686-1692, p35.]

At a court held 3 August 1687 Thomas Monday was acquitted of this fine [Ibid, p42.]

6 July 1687
Appointed Constable: …ordered that Tho. Monday officiate as Constable for this ensuing yeare [to replace Jno. Williamson who was appointed to replace Edward Rowsey] in the room & precinct of the sd. Rowsey the sd. Wm’son being acquitted… [Old Rappahannock County Court Orders 1686-1692, p37.]

The chief duty of Constables was to inspect tobacco. Because tobacco was both the principal crop and the currency, county courts divided the county into precincts and appointed constables to inspect and count the crop.  Constables served a term of one year.  

Note that this implies that Thomas Munday was literate.

6 June 1688
Replaced: Ordered that John Stronge officiate as Constable this ensuing yeare in the p’cint of Tho. Monday. [Old Rappahannock County Court Orders 1686-1692, p96. Indexed as p75.]

3 April 1689
Court Order: Ordered that Tho. Monday be paid 200 pounds tobacco & cask out of the estate of Robt. Reading being for survey of the orphans land with cost of suit etc. [Old Rappahannock County Court Orders 1686-1692, p147. Indexed as p116.]

Same date: Tho. Monday a juror in “the long & tedious” case of a breach of contract suit involving the construction of a sloop. [Ibid., p148.]

5 March 1689/90
Headright Certificate: At a court held or Rappa. County… Certificate according to act of Assembly is granted to Capt. Geo. Taylor for 1150 acres of land for the importation of 23 several persons, by name John Jones, Edw’d Howard, Tho. Monday, Abigail Hancock, Wm. Colston, Margarett Prichett, Grace Redland, Rich’d Russell… [Old Rappahannock County Court Orders 1686-1692, p199.]

George Taylor evidently sold this certificate.  16 of the 23 names in the certificate, in the same order, were among the 19 headrights claimed by Charles Brown for a patent of 920 acres in Essex County issued on 26 October 1694. [Virginia Patent Book 8, p399.] This is an illustration of the fact that headlight certificates were commonly bought and sold like any other valuable item, so that the patentee was not necessarily the same person as the importer.  

Headrights were claimed either in the county courts or a the Secretary’s office, resulting in a certificate that served as a warrant to the county surveyor and and payment for the patented land. The names of the headrights normally appeared in the resulting patent.  

Which Thomas Munday this was is uncertain.  Misuse of headrights was rampant by this time.  It is possible that Thomas Munday reentered Virginia from a trip to Maryland, for instance.  It could even reflect an agreement by Thomas Munday to allow George Taylor to claim his importation.  Note that some of the names are unlikely to have been imported servants. William Colston, for example, was clerk of the Rappahannock Court at this time.

2 & 3 April 1690
Juror: Thomas Monday a juror in the case of Henry Cases & Mingo a mulatto accused of stealing a hog, and on the following day in the civil case of Arthur Forbes vs. Samuel Thacker.  [Old Rappahannock County Court Orders 1686-1692, p209 and p211.]

5 November 1691
Court Order: Ordered that Tho. Monday some time between this & the 10th day of May now next following do build a sufficient prison on the Town land at Hobbs Hole on the South side the County according to the dimensions & ___ of the North side prison and that the sd. Monday be allowed for the same 6000 pounds of tobb. & caske fm. this p’cinct levey. [Old Rappahannock County Court Orders 1686-1692, p335. Indexed as p239.]

“Hobbs his hole”, as it was called in a few records, was a trading post and wharf established by Jacob Hobbs in or adjacent to a settlement on the Rappahannock River that later became known as Tappahannock.  The river was navigable for ocean-going ships up to that point.

16 April 1692
Old Rappahannock County is split into Essex (south of the river) and Richmond (north of the river) counties.

10 February 1692/3
Headright Certificate: Certificate according to act of Assembly is granted to Wm. Clapham for 1900 acres of land for ye importation of 38 persons into this colony whose names are Valentine Mayo, Wyatt Bassett, Tho. King, Rich’d Golden, Susanna Garrett… Rich’d Monjoy… [Essex County Order Book 1, 1692-1695, p52.]

It appears that this name is Richard Monjoy rather than Richard Mondoy — although Essex County records index it as “Monday” — Note that this certificate was used for a patent to Arthur Spicer in 1693 for land in Essex County, when the name was rendered as “Monjoy”. [Virginia Patent Book 8, p271.]

This is yet another case where the person.obtaining the headlight certificate was not the person who used it for a patent.

10 September 1694
Court Order: James Bowler, Thomas Munday, Jno. Searle & Jno. Dicks on the 20th of this present… meet at the house that Daniel Diskins is building for a Court House and consider land & make enquiry & adjudge of the tru value & worth of the sd. house… make report under their hands in writing to the next Court… [William & Mary Quarterly, Vol.18, No.3 (July 1938), p310.]

16 October 1694
Land Patent: Mr. Charles Brown, 920 acres in Essex County on branches of Occupation Run. & Cockelshell Creek, for importation of 19 persons including Tho. Monday.  [Virginia Patent Book 8, p399.]

Note that 16 of the 19 names (including Thomas Monday) were from the headright certificate obtained by George Taylor in 1690.  That is, Charles Brown was not the importer.  Roughly half of all certificates were obtained by a different person than the patentee.  

10 September 1695
Case Jury: Thomas Munday a juror in civil case. [Essex County Order Book 1, p258.]

10 September 1695
Deed: George Ward and Mary his wife sold to Thomas Munday 200 acres, the plantation where George and Mary now live between Hoskins and Gilsons Creek bordering Richard Nightingale. The land was granted to Coll: Thomas Goodrich 29 October 1666 and assigned to John Wells who patented it on 22 December 1682 and bequeathed it to Mary his wife. [Essex County Order Book 1, p373.]

11 November 1695:
Deed: Thomas Munday sells the land back to George Ward & Mary his wife. Signed: Thomas John Peatle and John Wood, witnesses.  [Essex County Order Book 1, p380.]

Note: I did not have access to the original record book, which seems to be a different Order Book than the one labelled “1692-1695”.; this is a summary from a correspondent. Deeds recorded between 1692 and late 1695 are not recorded in Deed Books 2 or 3 but rather in this Order Book which I have not yet examined.  

The intent of these deeds and the effect are probably the same.  The effect of these deeds was to shift title to the land from George Ward’s wife to George Ward.  In those days, this was the only means of accomplishing this sort of title transfer because a married woman was not an independent legal entity who could transfer property in her own name.

The land had been devised by John Wells to his wife Mary, who them married George Ward. Since Mary entered the marriage already owning the land, George Ward held a right of curtesy (similar to a wife’s right of dower) but could not devise it in his will because the land remained the sole property of his wife upon the death of either. After these deeds were executed, Mary acquired a dower right and George Ward could devise the land in his will. 

11 November 1695
Sale: At a court held 11th day of November 1695… Thomas Munday appeared & acknowledged an assignment of a deed of sale of a parcel of land.. to George Ward & Mary his wfe…Also Sarah Munday wife to ye above named Thomas Munday appeared & freely & voluntarily relinquished her right of Dower of in & to the above mentioned land. [Essex County Order Book 1, p259.]

See above.  

6 August 1696
Inventory : Estate of Elizabeth Lynch inventoried and appraised by Thomas Munday & others. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 9, p58.]

Note: In 1696-1698 Thomas Munday was also an appraiser of the estates of William Merritt, Robert Pley, Thomas Blanton, Daniel Diskin, James Holloway, Peter Hyman, and Brian Reyley.  Since near neighbors were chosen for that duty, this may be helpful some day in more accurately placing the location of Thomas Munday‘s land. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 9, pages 80, 211, 215, 243, 281, 286, 342.]

7 January 1697/8
Report of a commission appointed on 23 November 1697 to settle a land division between Robert Plaine and Capt. Wm. Moseley included Thomas (“TH”) Monday who signed with a “Th” mark. ] [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 9, p157.]

3 May 1698
Report of a commission appointed on 10 January 1697/8 to value improvements made ny Capt. Wm. Moseley on the land now surveyed for Robert Payne included Thomas (“TH”) Monday [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 9, p212.]

Thomas Munday Sr. again signed with a “Th” mark.  He used the same mark in later records, including his will.  Were earlier signatures not noted as marks by the clerk at the time, or is he  now unable by age or illness to sign his name?  

1? February 1698/9
Appraisal of estate of Bryan Ryley, In response to an order of 10 January 1698/9, valued by  Thomas (“TH”) Monday, Edmund Paget, Tho. Hinklestaff. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 9, p342.]

Thomas Munday again signed with a “Th” mark.  

10? December 1699
Appointments of Surveyors of the Highways: Tho. Monday is appointed surveyor of ye high ways from Tandy’s Mill to Pley’s Mill for the enduing year. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, section with Court Orders 1699-1702, p28.]

This is potentially helpful in identifying Munday’s location.  Robert Mills was appointed surveyor from Pley’s Mill to White’s Run, and Richard Gregory from White’s Run to Piscataway Creek, etc. etc.  These assignments imply that both Pley’s Mill and Tandy’s Mill were to the north of Tappahannock.   

Pley’s Mill (operated by Robert Pley) was apparently located somewhere along Gelson’s Creek (aka Jilson’s , Jelson’s), now called Mount Landing Creek, which runs roughly west to east north of Tappahannock and empties into the river about a mile above Tappahannock.  

The location of Tandy’s Mill is uncertain.  There is a modern creek called Mill Creek, but it doesn’t seem to be the same creek as the Mill Creek referred to in these early patents and deeds.  This court record suggests that Tandy’s land and his mill may have been on a portion or tributary of Mount Landing Creek, portions of which were once known as Mill Creek as well as Gelson’s Creek

11 July 1700
Headright Certificate: Certificate according to Act of Assembly is granted to Tho. Munday for 350 acres of land due for importation of seven persons into this colony by name Jno. Solomon, Eliz’a Savage, Wm. Clay, Mary Jones, Eliz’a Norton [Horton?], Eliz’a Sanders & Tho. Burden [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, section with Court Orders 1699-1702, p47.]

Thomas Munday evidently sold this certificate, for it was used on 20 October 1704 for a 2400-acre patent in Essex County to James Boughan, Richard Covington and William Williams.  That patent included among the headrights the same seven names in the same sequence.


Note: Deeds & Wills Book 10 is numbered differently than the page numbers shown in published abstracts and indices.  The page numbers below are those marked in the deed book as shown in LDS Film #007645184 as of early 2022. I have added some wording not in the abstracts and abbreviated or omitted some language of no genealogical value.


1 August 1700
Deed: James Monkester of Charles County in ye Province of Maryland, planter & eldest son of James Monkester late of the said county & province deceased, brother of Henry Monkester late of Rappa. County in ye Colony of Virginia also dec’d, to Thomas Munday of the County of Essex, n ye Colony of Virginia, Planter,… for £19:15s lawfull money of England… 200 acres “all that tract of land which the said Henry Monkester dyed seized of… on the north side of ye Mill Creeke it being part of 300 acres of land conveyed to ye sd Henry Monkester by John Daingerfield…  and is lawfully come & descended to ye sd James Monkester (party to these presents) as heir to ye sd Henry Monkester, his Uncle… Signed: James (X) Monkester. Witness: Francis Meriwether, John Butler, Tho. Gregson. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, p45-6. Indexed as p54-5]

On 10 April 1701, Mrs Elizabeth Pley aged 58 or thereabouts deposed that about 32 years ago she very well knew Henry Moncaster and James Moncaster now deceased when they lived upon the land together with Mr. Tho. Munday. Elizabeth Pley (ne Parker) was the widow of Robert Pley who operated Pley’s mill and who had died in 1697.  

11 September 1700
Undated Will:   John Peatle of ye Parish of Sittingbourne & County of Essex being sick & weak of body…  I give & dispose thereof as followeth:
Item I give unto Tho. Munday, ye Son of Thomas Munday, my largest Stillards with Pce & Canhooks belonging to them.
Item I give unto John Munday, ye Son of Thomas Munday, my other Stillards with Pce & Canhooks belonging to them.
Item I give unto Sarah Munday, ye Wife of Thomas Munday, a hogshead of tobacco of mine lying att ye house of Francis James in Richmond County under my own marke.
Item I give & bequeath unto Frances Munday & Martha Munday, ye Daughters of Tho. Munday equally between them a hogshead of tobacco of mine at Mr. Tho. Peirces in Richmond County under my own marke.
Item I give unto Hanah Munday, Daughter of Tho. Munday, my Trunck with Lock & key.
Item I give unto Charles Munday, ye Son of Thomas Munday, my two yards & three quarters of brand cloth now in ye house of ye sd Tho. Munday.
Item I give unto Joseph Munday, ye Son of Thomas Munday, my remnant of speckled dimity, also now in ye sd Tho. Mundays house.
Item I give unto Thomas Munday my best Carolina Hatt
Item I give unto Tho. Munday & John Munday, Sons of Tho. Munday, each of them two pair of shoes that are in my Chest & all my Bookes equally between them.
Item All ye rest & residue of my Estate, Goods & Chattles whatsoever, I do give & bequeath unto Hanah Munday who I make full & sole Executrix of this my last Will & Testament and I do hereby revoke & make void all former Wills &Testaments by me heretofore made. In Witness whereof I ye sd John Peatle to this my last Will & Testament have sett my hand & seale ye day & year aforesaid.  Signed: John (ye mark of “IP”) Peatle.  Witness: Tho. Winslow, John Parker.
Proved by Tho. Winslow & John Parker on 11 September 1700 & administration with the will annexed granted to Thomas Munday on ye sd. deceased’s Estate dureing ye minority of Hanah Munday his Daughter.
[Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, p53-54.]

Some family genealogists have interpreted this will to mean that Sarah Munday was Peatle’s daughter.  But the will does not mention any relationships whatsoever.  Furthermore, there are no court, probate, or deed records in Old Rappahannock or Essex counties that mention anyone named Peatle until September 1694, after which John Peatle appears regularly as a witness to deeds, wills and bonds by neighbors of the Mundays.  (Note also that Thomas Munday must have married Sarah several years after arriving in Rappahannock, since his children were all still minors in 1700, but several years before the arrival of John Peatle.)  It is perhaps more likely that John Peatle was a recently arrived single man with no children of his own who lived with the Munday family — his modest estate contained no household items of any kind, which suggests that he was a boarder. That he was a boarder of the Munday family is suggested by the fact that his estate was inventoried by three close neighbors of Thomas Munday.  He must have had some special relationship with teenaged Hannah Munday, which might account for naming her the executor rather than her parents or siblings.  

A stillard (sometimes called a steelyard) is a large off-center balance scale, perhaps used by Peatle to weigh cloth (he seems to have been a tailor) or perhaps tobacco.  The item to be weighed is placed on the short arm and weights are hooked onto the long arm.  Dimity is a kind of cloth, at this time in history probably of either silk or wool.

John Peatle seems to arrived in the area — or in Virginia — about 1694.  The earliest record of him is his appearance as a witness on 10 September 1694 (OB 1, p316) and he makes three similar appearances as a witness in 1694 and 1695 (Ibid., p334, 342, 381). On 12 December 1699 , by virtue of a power of attorney from Sarah Stone, he communicated her release of dower in a sale of land by her husband William Stone (D&W 10, p31.). He also witnessed the will of John Williamson, another neighbor, on 29 June 1695.  With so many records of him in 1694 and 1695, he was surely not in the area until then.

11 September 1700
Administration Bond: Thomas Munday bond for £50 as administrator with the will annexed of John Peatle “during ye minority of Hannah Munday his Daughter Exec’x therein named”… Securities Tho. Gregson & Tho. Hucklescott.  Signed: Tho. (his “TH” mark) Munday.  Witness: Hen. Goare, Francis Merriwether. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, p54.]. Also mentioned in court orders [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, section of Court Orders 1699-1702, p57.]

This is Thomas Munday Sr. signing with the distinctive mark “TH”.  An “administrator with the will annexed” was named whenever a will either failed to name an executor or an executor was unable or unwilling to serve. In this case, Hannah Munday was a minor, which would have prevented her from executing some potential actions that might be required of an executor such as making a contract, suing a debtor, etc.  (At this time, a woman could be an executor at the age of eighteen but would still be prevented from taking actions that only an adult could take.)

11 September 1700
Deed: Thomas Munday of Sittingbourne Parish, Essex County to Thomas Winslow of the same parish and county, for £7:10s, 100 acres it being part of a tract of 200 acres that Thomas Munday had purchased on 1 August last past from James Monkester of Charles County, Maryland. Signed: Thomas (his mark “TH”) Munday. Witness: Fra. Taliaferro, ___ Hill, Robt. Mobley?   Thomas Munday acknowledged the deed in court and his wife Sarah Munday relinquished her dower rights. [Essex County, Virginia, Deed Book 10, p54. Indexed as p58.]

On 10 April 1701, Jno Wilkerson aged 40 years or thereabouts deposed that he knew James Moncaster of Charles County Maryland who sold a Tract of Land in this County to Mr Thomas Munday. [Virginia State Library, Research and Information Services Division, Essex County Court Records, County Court Papers 1683-1728, Folder 4/1701.]

30 December 1700
Court Order: Judgment is granted Paul Micou ag’t Tho. Munday adm’r with the will annexed of Jno. Peatle…  for 170 pd. of tob’o due by acct..  [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, section of Court Orders 1699-1702, p75.]

11 February 1700/1
Inventory: Estate of John Peatle by Edmund Pagett, Geo. Lloyde, John Graboe.  The inventory included a large inventory of various cloths and buttons, thread, shirts, cloaks, some buckles and other tailoring supplies plus a “little bay horse” with two saddles, one chest, “a parcel of old books”, “an old trunk and some other things”, 8 shillings in money, and the two stillards mentioned in his will.  The estate was small, barely 2700 lbs of tobacco plus 850 lb. of “Tobb: ordered by the Vestry”. Presented by Thomas Munday administrator with the will annexed.  [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, p68. Indexed as p69.]

Notably, there were no household items of any kind — no bed, chairs, kitchen utensils, tableware, etc.  The leads me to suspect that Mr. Peatle was a border of the Munday family. His profession is unclear — h could sign his name and was apparently literate, which may account for his frequent appearance and a witness, but the inventory contained an unusual amount of what appear to be the supplies of a tailor.

11 February 1700/1
Court:  Thomas Munday making oath that ye estate of Jno. Peatle dec’d is indebted to him by amt. 2000 pds. of Tob’o it is therefore ordered that he be allowed ye same out of ye estate with costs. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, section of Court Orders 1699-1702, p77.]

This is two-thirds of the value of the estate and more than the fee an administrator would normally charge.  Also note that this preceded the claims against the estate a few months later, so it is possible that Thomas Munday was protecting his daughter’s legacy. It isn’t a particularly large amount by itself, but the estate was quite meager. This probably represents everything left over after the individual legacies were delivered — in other words, his daughter Hannah Munday, who was bequeathed the residual estate, may have ended up with nothing unless this 2000 pounds was intended for her.

10 June 1701
Court Orders: Nicholas Morean not appearing to prosecute his suit ag’t  Thomas Munday as adm’r with the will annexed of Jno. Peatle… is nonsuited & ordered to pay damages according to law…
The suit between Thomas Winslow Plt. & Tho. Munday ye Def’t. is dismiss for want of prosecution. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, section of Court Orders 1699-1702, p91 and p92.]

10 November 1701
Bond:  Claude Loyson as executor of John Williamson, with Thomas (“TH”) Munday and John Graves his securities. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, p91.]

10 November 1701
Court Order: Thomas Munday, John Graves, Thomas Davis, and John Parker or any three of them inventory and appraise the estate of John Williamson. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, section of Court Orders 1699-1702, p100.]

12 November 1701
County Levy:  Among the debits for this year:  “Tho.Munday for one wolfes head by Pitt..300″ [pounds of tobacco]

Most of Virginia paid a bounty for killing wolves.  Wolves killed by gunshot were paid 200 pounds but those trapped in pitts were worth 300 pounds.

11 April 1702
Court Order:  In the suite brought by Nath’l West agt. Tho. Munday for entertaining his runaway serv’t by name Peter Fletcher, the Def’t by James Boughan his attorney for plea saith not guilty in manner and form wherefore the matter is referred to a Jury who by name [names of jurors omitted here] being first sworn returned for verdict Wee of the Jury find for the Def’t… order’d that the Pltf pay damages according to law with costs. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, section of Court Orders 1699-1702, p118.]

10 March 1701/2
Executor Bond: Edmund Paget & Robt. Mills bond for 10,000 pounds of good Tobo [tobacco] as executors of the will of Elizabeth Browne, with Tho. Munday security.  Signed: Edmund Paget, Robt. (his “8” mark) Mills, Tho. (his “th” mark) Monday. Witnesses: Hen: Adcocke, Geo: Lloyde. Recorded 10 March 1701. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, p102.]

Elizabeth Browne’s will recorded on the previous page, dated 2 February 1698/9 and proved on 10 March 1701/2, split goods located at Robert Mills’ house between Robert Mills and Edmund Pagett Sr., forgave a debt from John Mills, made bequests to her sons Francis Browne and Daniel Browne, and gave 12 to daughter Sarah (no surname mentioned).  Pagett and Mills were named executors. 

Elizabeth Browne was the widow of Francis Brown Sr., whose will was dated 10 November 16909 and proved 3 February 1691. It split his property among his wife Elizabeth his two sons Francis and Daniel, and “my power daughters Elizabeth, Sarah, Mary and Rebecca”. 

11 April 1702
Court Order:  In the suite brought bay Nath’l West agt. Tho. Munday for entertaining his runaway serv’t by name Peter Fletcher, the Def’t by James Boughan his attorney for plea saith not guilty in manner and form wherefore the matter is referred to a Jury who by name [names of jurors omitted here] being first sworn returned for verdict Wee of the Jury find for the Def’t… order’d that the Pltf pay damages according to law with costs. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, section of Court Orders 1699-1702, p118.]

1 August 1702
Will: “I Tho: Munday of Sittenbourne parish in the County of Essex and Colony of Virg’a being Sick and weak of body but of sound and perfect mind…”
“Item I give and bequeath unto my eldest son Thomas Munday and to his heirs lawfully begotten my new plantacon at the Upper part of my Land bounded as followeth Viz’t beginning at a Spanish oak at the Spring belonging to the sd Plantacon and so runing Down the branch of the sd Spring untill you come unto the maine branch thence up that branch which John Graves his Spring is in to my Westermost Line thence along my sd line to my corner tree being a Spanish oak thence along east or thereabouts to my next corner tree and thence along till you come to the white oak swamp thence up the sd Swamp to a marked white oak upon the head of the sd White oak swamp thence along the Eastermost side of the sd plantacon to the first mentioned Spanish oak to him as aforsd…
Item I give unto my son John Munday and his heirs for ever Lawfully begotten all my Land lying on the eastermost side of my son Thomas Plantacon before bequeathed beginning at a marked white oak at the head of ye White oak swamp quite down to the Desert swamp.
Item I give unto my son Charles Munday and his heirs Lawfully begotten for ever all the rest of my Land not yet bequeathed Lying on ye Eastermost side of the desert swamp untill you come unto the saw pit branch. [this item was repeated when copied into the will book]
Item I give unto my son Joseph Munday the plantacon where I now live upon to him & his heirs for ever Lawfully begotten with all the rest of my Land adjacent to the sd plantacon not before bequeathed.
Item I further give unto my son Thomas Munday two mares and a Colt he having the same now in his own possession.
Item I further give unto my son Thomas Munday two Cows and two Calves as also a Steer of seven years old to be delivered unto the sd Thomas Munday as soon as he Shall go to house keeping.
Item I further give unto my son Thomas Munday a new fether bed and furniture for ever.
Item I further give unto my son Thomas Munday Six large Pewter Dishes & Six large Pewter plates to be delivered unto him the sd Thomas Munday as soon as he shall go to house keeping for ever.
Item I further give unto my son Thomas Munday an Iron pot a Middlesize pot holsters pistolls and sword the sd pot as soon as he shall go to housekeeping but the holsters pistolls and sword to be Delivered unto the sd Thomas Munday Immediately after my Decease.
Item I further give unto Eldest Thomas Munday one irish boy named Thomas to be delivered unto the sd Thomas Munday Immediately after my decease.
Item it is further my will that the sd Thomas Munday John Munday or any of my sons to whom I have bequeathed my Lands may have Lawfull power and authority to convey and Dispose of any part or parcell of their Lands by me bequeathed each one to another from brother to brother in Case of necessity or convenience but not to convey or Dispose of any part or parcell of the aforesd bequeathed Lands to any person or persons whatsoever but from brother to brother as aforesd as for the rest of my Estate negroes goods houshold goods chattels and Implements whatsoever I do give and bequeath unto my Loveing wife Sarah my Son John my son Charles my son Joseph my Daughter Hannah my daughter Frances my daughter Mary and my Daughter Martha the same to be brought to an appraisem’t and to be equally divided Amongst them the persons above mentioned and I do hereby constitute and appoint my Eldest Son Thomas Munday and my Loveing wife Sarah Ex’ex & Ex’er of this my Last will and testament and it is my will and Desire that my Ex’er or Ex’ex above mentioned do give good & Suff’t Security for my Children’s Estate abovementioned While they shall attain to Lawful age &[?] to the worshipful Court and I further desire that my Loveing brother Francis Brown see that this my Last will & Testament be justly and honestly performed according to the true Intent and meaning thereof.
Signed: Tho (his “Th” mark) Munday. Witness: Edmund Pagett, Ephraim Pagett, Francis Pagett.  Proved by the oaths of witnesses in Essex County Court this 10th day of Aug’t 1703.  [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 11, pp55.]

Several points:  (1) The children may all be under age; (2) Sarah is not specifically identified as the mother of the children. (3) “Brother Frances Brown” could be his wife’s brother, the husband of a sister, or his stepbrother (see discussion of Elizabeth Brown’s will), or even the brother of a first wife.  His wife’s name was Elizabeth according to his 1708 will.  (4) The will abrogates his wife’s legally established one-third share of personal property — could she be a second wife?

Is his wife Sarah the same person as the Sarah (no surname given) of Elizabeth Browne’s 1699 will?  Is she the mother of Thomas Munday’s children? 

11 August 1702
Court Order: Thomas Munday, adm’r with the will annexed of John Peatle dec’d during the minority of Hannah Munday Exec’x therein named, presented a further acct.of ye sd dec’ds Estate which is ordered to be recorded. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 10, section of Court Orders 1699-1702, p133.]

10 August 1703
Will of Thomas Munday proved.  [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 11, p59.]

10 August 1703
Bond:  Sarah Munday & Thomas Munday, £1,000 sterl(ing) as executors of estate of Thomas Munday, with securities Geo. Loyd and Thomas (x) Thrashley. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 11, p61.]

7 September 1703
Inventory of Thomas Munday estate taken by Francis Gouldman, Rich’d Covington and John Graves and presented on 7 June 1704 by Thomas Munday and Sarah (x) Munday.  The inventory is quite lengthy, filling more than three full pages and totaling £268:2:10½. It included large quantities of a wide variety of fabrics, a large quantity of clothing items (e.g., 14 pairs of men’s stockings, five pairs of women’s stockings, 22 pairs of boys and girls stockings), four slaves, a servant with a year and a half left to serve,  carpenter’s and cooper’s tools, 5 beds, and quantities of farm and household equipment. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 12, pp19-22.]

A supplemental inventory totaling £72:19:9 and consisting of livestock and miscellaneous goods (167 quart bottles!) was filed on the same date 7 June 1704. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 12, p22.]

Note the very large quantity of fabric and clothing and the similarity to the much more modest inventory of John Peatle which mainly consisted of fabrics..

1 June 1704
SittingBourne parish abolished.  The precise boundaries of the new parishes are uncertain:
South Farnham parish served the lower portion of Essex County
St. Anne’s parish served the upper portion of Essex County, including the part that became Caroline County in 1728

The Mundays were located in St. Anne’s parish

10 June 1704
Witness: Tho. Munday witness to bond of Sarah Sallis as administratrix of Samuel Sallis. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 11, p238.]
Witness: Tho. Munday witness to bond of Richard Goode & Florinda Tharpe as executors of Thomas Tharpe deceased. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 11, p247.]

1704
Quit Rent Roll, Essex County:  Tho. Munday – 500 acres

The other sons are evidently not yet 21 and the land is listed for Thomas Munday.  Francis Brown is listed with 150 acres.  

19 November 1705
Deed: John Catlett & Richard Covington, trustees appointed to dispose of Town land, to Robert Coleman, ½ acre lot in Hobbs his Hole. Witness: Rich’d Buckner, Aug’t Smith, Thomas Munday, John Sanders. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 12, p127.]

10 May 1707
Bond: Martha Moseley as administratrix of Robert Moseley with securities Thomas Munday and James Reeves. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 12, p411.]

One of several examples of Thomas Munday apparently signing his name.

19 August 1707
A true and perfect Inventory of all & Singular the Goods & Chattels of James Reeves Dec’d taken & appraised by us the Subscribers ye 19th Day of August 1707… Signed by Robert (x) Mills, William (x) Grinall, and John Waggoner,. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 13, p33-34.]

See the entry below for a continuation of this item two months later.

6 October 1707
In obedience to an order of Essex County Court dated ye 11th of September 1707 we the Subscribers have further appraised of the said Deceased [James Reeves] Estate…  Same three signatures.  “Presented by Henry Reeves, Joseph Reeves, & Thomas Munday & Mary his wife late Mary Reeves adm’rs  of the Estate of James Reeves Dec’ed own oath to Essex County Court y e10th Day of October 1707.”  [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 13, p34-35.]

Some genealogists interpret this to mean that Mary was the widow of James Reeves. However, it seems clear that she was his sister.  Henry, Joseph, Mary and James were all children of Henry Reeves Sr. and .his wife Elizabeth.  

Henry Reeves wrote a will dated in 1686 and proved in April 1687 naming his wife “Eliza” and sons Henry, Joseph and James (the latter two under 18), along with “my three younger daughters Martha, Mary & Ann” (all under 16), and two older daughters Elizabeth and Rebecca.  His widow Elizabeth Reeves’ will (see below) named the same children (less James) along with her grandsons Edward Moseley and Thomas Munday.

6 August 1708
A List Owing to the Estate of James Reeves…  [among 80-odd names]. John Munday by acct. £6:8:8…  presented by administrators Henry Reeves, Jos. Reeves, & Thomas Munday. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 13, p153.]

It isn’t clear from this whether John Munday has reached adulthood or not, but it seems likely.

10 February 1708/9
Deed: Richard Cauthorn of South Farnham parish to Francis Gouldman of St. Ann’s parish, for 2100 pounds sweet scented tobacco paid by Francis Meriwether on behalf of Francis Gouldman, 500 acres… witnessed by Thomas Munday. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 13, p188.]

4 May 1709
Will: I Elizabeth Reeves of the County of Essex…
Imp’s, I give unto my Six Children Elizabeth, Henry, Rebeckah, Joseph, Martha & Mary Ten Shillings sterling money in some convenient time after my decease
It: I give unto my Grandson Edward Moseley young bay horse
It: I give unto my Grandson Thomas Munday one young black horse to him & his heirs for ever
It: I give & bequeath all the Remaining part of my Estate not yet bequeath unto my daughter Ann Reeves & her heirs lawfully begotten of her body for ever
It: I do hereby appoint my Daughter Ann Reeves my whole & Sole Exec’z. of this my last will & Testament…
It: It is my will & desire that my Exec’r give unto my Servant boy Samuel Henley at the time of his freedom one good Suit of clothes & one Two year old heifer. Signed: Elizabeth (her mark) Reeves. Witness: Thomas Munday, John Jatts(?), Timothy (x) Dayle.  Proved 14 February 1711/12.  [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 14, p16.]

Thomas Munday had married her daughter Mary, and their first child was evidently the grandson Thomas Munday.

10 October 1710
Deed: Andrew Harrison Senr. for diverse good causes & considerationsand thereunto moving but more especially by reason of ye natural affection I bear towards my daughter Elizabeth Munday have given granted aliened enfeoffed & confirmed and by these presents do give… unto my afores’d daughter & her heirs forever ye quantity of two hundred acres of land being one moiety or half part of a tract of 400 acres being my proportional part of a patent granted to me Richard Long & Samuel Ellit (sic)…lying on ye south side of Rappahannock river being bounded by the land of my son Andrew Harrison on the north side & on ye south east side by the line of Richard Long… Signed: Andrew (his “H” mark) Harrison. Witness: Thomas Munday, William Harrison. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 13, p367.]

This is the wife of John Munday.

10 October 1710
Deed: Andrew Harrison Senr. for diverse good causes & considerations and thereunto moving but more especially by reason of ye natural affection I bear towards my son William Harrison have given granted aliened enfeoffed & confirmed and by these presents do give… unto my son William afores’d & his heirs forever ye quantity of two hundred & Seventy acres of land being and being (sic) the third part of a dividend of land granted to Andrew Harrison, Richard Long & Samuel Elliott… south side fo Rappahannock River… (adjacent to Andew Harrison Jr. , John Bucjner, and William Harrison)  Signed: Andrew (his “H” mark) Harrison. Witness: Thomas Munday, Andrew Harrison Junr. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 13, p367.]

William Harrison married Hannah Munday.

11 March 1710/11
Will: John Butcher, all land to eldest son William Butcher, all personal property to wife Mary Butcher. Witnessed by Thomas Munday, John Strange, John Merritt. Proved by Thomas Munday & John Merritt 10 May 1711.  [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 13, p411.]

14 June 1711
Bond of John Munday as guardian of Charles Munday, £100 sterling, with securities John Bates & Thomas Merritt. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 13, p419.]

This is the first clear indication that John Munday has reached majority.

14 January 1711/12
Inventory of estate of Richard Wilton dec’d, in obedience to a court order of 13 December 1711, by John Graves, Thomas Munday and John Merritt.  Presented by  Richard Wilton, administrator of estate of Richard Wilton. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 14, p21.]

14 February 1711/12
Bond: John Mills Jr. as guardian of Anthony North, with securities Thomas Munday & Rich’d (x) Long. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 14, p16.]

14 February 1711/12
Bond:  Will of Elizabeth Reeves proved [see will above].  Edw’d Coleman & Ann his wife “late Ann Reeves” bond for £200 sterling as executors of estate of Elizabeth Reeves. Securities: Robert Coleman and Thomas Munday. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 14, p18.]

9 April 1713
Administration Bond: Ann Connaley bond of £200 as administratrix of John Connaley deceased, with securities James Holloway and John Munday. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 14, p117.]

19 December 1713
Witness: Thomas Munday, Salvator Muscoe, Arth. Bowers witness will of George Lloyd of St. Ann’s parish. Proved 14 January 1713/14. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 14, p167.]

6 July 1714
Inventory of estate of Mrs. Rebecca Tomlin dec’d, in obedience to a court order of 10 June 1714, by Tho. Winslow, Tho. Munday and Thomas Davis.  Presented 8 July 1714 by William Winston and wife Martha Winston, administrators of estate of Rebecca Tomlin.  [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 14, p265.]

12 August 1714
Witness: Thomas Munday, Wm. Upshaw, John Wills witness a deed of gift from Nicholas Smith of Gloucester County to his son Nicholas Smith Jr. of Essex County, the land he now lives on. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 14, p273.]

20 November 1714
Witness: Ro. Brooks Junr. Nath’ll Fogg and Thomas Munday witnesses to deed from Thomas Strashley Jr. to John Bagge for land in St. Ann’s parish. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 14, p324.]

17 April 1716
Quit Rents for the year 1715 according as they have been paid to the Receiver Gen’llll for th epattented lans in Essex County.  [From Miscellaneous Manuscript Papers in the Archives Division of the Virginia State Library, alphabetized and reproduced in a database at ancestry,co.]

There are no Mundays on the list. As this is a list of rents collected, it is possible that the Mundays were in arrears.  

21 March 1716/17
Will:  Elizabeth Purcell, to “loving son John Lawson” the plantation “”where I now live”, livestock and household goods, grandson James Burne one yew(?);
“Item I further will and desire that my son John Lawson remain & stay with Thomas Munday until he shall attain to the age of twenty one years. Item it is my will & desire that the sd Munday shall keep Robert Purcell until he shall attain to the age of twenty one years.” Signed: Elizabeth (x) Pursell (sic)  Witness: Garret Burne, Sarah Mackenny, Martha Munday (all by their marks). Proved 17 July 1717 the the oaths of Garret Burne and Sarah Mackenny. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 15, p88.]

Interesting. What was the relationship if any?  Note that this is the first appearance of Martha Munday as (presumably) an adult. The will failed to name an executor and, after Thomas Munday refused administration (see below), Garret Burne and Rebecca his wife posted bond as administrators with the will annexed.

22 May 1717
Thomas Munday appeared in court and refused to take upon himself the executorship (administration?) of the will of Elizabeth Pursell. [Essex County, Virginia, Order Book 5, page 39 – abstracted, original not read]

Order Book 5 (pages 1-379) is not available online, so this is an abstract.)

17 July 1717
Suit: James Boughan vs Thomas Munday, Thomas Munday presented an account which was recorded. “A true & perfect list of all the payts that I heave made as yet to my brothers & sisters belonging to the Estate of my hounour’d ffather—as followeth—”…
Octobr 8th 1707: William Harrison paid him £ 42.14.2
Jany ye 19th 1716: To paid John Munday 42.14.0
May ye 1t 1716. To paid Samll Profer 50.00.0
Janry ye 16th 1716. To paid Charles Munday 45.00.0
Decr ye 1t 1715. To paid ffrances Crittendon 16.02.9
March ye 18th 1716. To paid ffrances Crittendon £25:16:1 moar
In all [to Frances Crittenden] 41:18.2
The above accounts paid by me Thomas Munday
To my mother 42.14.2
Debt is 341–13–10
Paid 265–00–06
Due 76–13–04
& that the plt recover agt ye sd deft ye Costs of this Suit
[Essex County, Virginia, Order Book 5, page 67 – abstracted, original not read]

The first few hundred pages of Order Book 5 are not readily available online — this is an abstract.

ca 1717 ?
In an undated petition, Martha Munday Humbly Sheweth that her father Thomas Munday late of this County decd did by his last will & Testament Give unto ye pet. a Certain part or propor [illeg, one word] of his personall Estate…she has not received her portion from the executrix Sarah who was the wife of Thomas, and son Thomas. [Virginia State Library, Research and Information Services Division, Essex County Loose Papers, 1717–1752, No. 29400, 18 items, Ms D. found online at https://h600.org/wiki/B09-MundayOfVirginia.]

17 November 1717
Deed: John Cheek to Richard Cheek, 48 acres in South Farnham parish. Witness: John Dyer, Joseph (his mark) Munday, Jno. Rogers. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 15, p117.]

20 May 1718
Deed: Leonard Tarent to William Winston. 360 acres in St. Ann’s parish.  Witness: Tho. Pettit, John Boughan, John Munday. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 15, p68.]

15 May 1718
Deed: (smudged) Samuel Prosser to John Bendall, 50 acres in St. Mary’s parish on Golden Vaile Creek. Witness: John Munday, Tho. Spiers. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 16, p132.]

Golden Vaile (Goldenvale) Creek is a short creek emptying into the Rappahannock about 20 miles upriver from Tappahannock.

17 January 1718/19
Inventory: Pershowant (sic) to an order of Essex County Court dated the 18 day of November 1718 We the subscribers… have aprased (sic) the Estate of Thomas Monday deceased as followeth.. (totaling £22:14:9). by John Graves, John Merritt, Robt. Elliot.  Presented by Mary (her mark) Munday on 18 February 1718/19/. [Essex County Will Book 3, pp81.]

15/16 May 1719
Deed: Lease & Release from Samuel Prosser to John Bendall, both of St. Mary’s Parish, land on Golden Vaile Creek. Witness: John Munday, Tho. Spiers. [Essex County Deeds & Wills Book 16, p131.]

19 May 1719
Estate Accounting: Estate of Thomas Munday by Mary Munday, adm’x.  Credits included inventory £22:14:3, 398 lb of tobacco at £3:19:7, the sale of lambs, a steer, and hogs, and “1840 nailes” totaling £32:1:5.  Debits included “to Jos. Munday” £16:7:2, fees for clerical, appraisal, and funeral charges, and a £3 attorney fee for a total of £26:13:2, leaving £5:8:3.  [Essex County Will Book 3, p91.]

Very odd that the bulk of the estate was owed or paid to Joseph Munday. Was he guardian of the children and this their share?  

4 September 1719
Will of John Greaves (Graves) – wife Hannah Graves, sons James Graves and Benjamin Graves, daughters Martha, Ann and Jean Graves.  Witnesses: Robt. Elliott, John Munday, Johannah (x) Elliott.  Proved 17 May 1720 by oath of Robt. Elliott and John Munday. [Essex County Will Book 3, p140.]

18 December 1719
John Munday, Daniel Diskin, Martha (x) Lloyd witnesses to will of Robert Foster [Essex County Will Book 3, p140.]

These records are continued for 1720 and beyond on the next page